innuendo

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in·nu·en·do

 (ĭn′yo͞o-ĕn′dō)
n. pl. in·nu·en·does
1. An indirect or subtle, usually derogatory implication in expression; an insinuation.
2. Law A plaintiff's allegation explicating the defamatory meaning of the publication or utterance in a libel suit.

[From Latin innuendō, by hinting, ablative of innuendum, gerund of innuere, to nod to : in-, to, toward; see in-2 + -nuere, to nod.]

innuendo

(ˌɪnjʊˈɛndəʊ)
n, pl -dos or -does
1. an indirect or subtle reference, esp one made maliciously or indicating criticism or disapproval; insinuation
2. (Law) law (in pleading) a word introducing an explanatory phrase, usually in parenthesis
3. (Law) law (in an action for defamation)
a. an explanation of the construction put upon words alleged to be defamatory where the defamatory meaning is not apparent
b. the words thus explained
[C17: from Latin, literally: by hinting, from innuendum, gerund of innuere to convey by a nod, from in-2 + nuere to nod]

in•nu•en•do

(ˌɪn yuˈɛn doʊ)

n., pl. -dos, -does.
1. an indirect intimation about a person or thing, esp. of a disparaging nature.
2. Law. a parenthetic explanation or specification in a pleading.
[1555–65; < Latin: by nodding, abl. of innuendum, ger. of innuere to signal with a nod]

innuendo

- Latin for "by nodding at, pointing to," or "intimating," from in-, "toward," and nuere, "nod."
See also related terms for pointed.

innuendo

Subtle or indirect implication, usually of something discreditable.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.innuendo - an indirect (and usually malicious) implication
implication - an accusation that brings into intimate and usually incriminating connection

innuendo

noun insinuation, suggestion, hint, implication, whisper, overtone, intimation, imputation, aspersion The report was based on rumours and innuendo.

innuendo

noun
An artful, indirect, often derogatory hint:
Translations
AnspielungInnuendo
vihjaus

innuendo

[ˌɪnjʊˈendəʊ] N (innuendo(e)s (pl)) → indirecta f, insinuación f
his comments were full of sexual innuendosus comentarios estaban llenos de alusiones or connotaciones sexuales

innuendo

[ˌɪnjuˈɛndəʊ] [innuendoes] (pl) nsous-entendu m
sexual innuendo → allusions fpl à caractère sexuel

innuendo

n pl <-es> → versteckte Andeutung; sexual innuendosexuelle Anspielung

innuendo

[ˌɪnjʊˈɛndəʊ] n (insinuation) → insinuazione f; (sexual) → allusione f
References in classic literature ?
Joseph had instilled into him a pride of name, and of his lineage; he would, had he dared, have fostered hate between him and the present owner of the Heights: but his dread of that owner amounted to superstition; and he confined his feelings regarding him to muttered innuendoes and private comminations.
I determined to commence a series of covert insinuations, or innuendoes, about the oblong box--just to let him perceive, gradually, that I was NOT altogether the butt, or victim, of his little bit of pleasant mystification.
Their chatter, their laughter, their good-humoured innuendoes, above all, their flashes and flickerings of envy, revived Tess's spirits also; and, as the evening wore on, she caught the infection of their excitement, and grew almost gay.
I knew this was all pointed at me; and these, and all similar innuendoes, affected me far more deeply than any open accusations would have done; for against the latter I should have been roused to speak in my own defence: now I judged it my wisest plan to subdue every resentful impulse, suppress every sensitive shrinking, and go on perseveringly, doing my best; for, irksome as my situation was, I earnestly wished to retain it.
I dislike mysteries and innuendoes," he went on, harshly.
But they don't speak openly to me about such things: it is only by hints and innuendoes, and by what I hear others say, that I knew what they think.
Inglethorp and Evelyn Howard, and of the latter's innuendoes.
Sedley fancies that she is growing insolent and ungrateful, and, as the guilty thief who fears each bush an officer, sees threatening innuendoes and hints of capture in all the girl's speeches and answers.
He read another article, too, a financial one, which alluded to Bentham and Mill, and dropped some innuendoes reflecting on the ministry.
Some of my readers may remember a little book from her pen, published in Paris, a mystically bad-tempered, declamatory, and frightfully disconnected piece of writing, in which she all but admits the foreknowledge, more than hints at its supernatural origin, and plainly suggests in venomous innuendoes that the guilt of the act was not with the terrorists, but with a palace intrigue.