inordinate


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in·or·di·nate

 (ĭn-ôr′dn-ĭt)
adj.
1. Exceeding reasonable limits; immoderate. See Synonyms at excessive.
2. Archaic Not regulated; disorderly.

[Middle English inordinat, from Latin inōrdinātus, disordered : in-, not; see in-1 + ōrdinātus, past participle of ōrdināre, to set in order (from ōrdō, ōrdin-, order; see ar- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots).]

in·or′di·na·cy, in·or′di·nate·ness n.
in·or′di·nate·ly adv.

inordinate

(ɪnˈɔːdɪnɪt)
adj
1. exceeding normal limits; immoderate
2. unrestrained, as in behaviour or emotion; intemperate
3. irregular or disordered
[C14: from Latin inordinātus disordered, from in-1 + ordināre to put in order]
inˈordinacy, inˈordinateness n
inˈordinately adv

in•or•di•nate

(ɪnˈɔr dn ɪt)

adj.
1. not within proper limits; excessive: to drink an inordinate amount of wine.
2. unrestrained in conduct, feelings, etc.: an inordinate lover of antiques.
3. disorderly; uncontrolled.
4. not regulated; irregular: inordinate hours.
[1350–1400; Middle English inordinat < Latin inordinātus disordered]
in•or′di•nate•ly, adv.
in•or′di•nate•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inordinate - beyond normal limitsinordinate - beyond normal limits; "excessive charges"; "a book of inordinate length"; "his dress stops just short of undue elegance"; "unreasonable demands"
immoderate - beyond reasonable limits; "immoderate laughter"; "immoderate spending"

inordinate

inordinate

adjective
Exceeding a normal or reasonable limit:
Translations
nezřízený

inordinate

[ɪˈnɔːdɪnɪt] ADJ (= excessive) → excesivo; (= unrestrained) → desmesurado, desmedido
he spent an inordinate amount of time/money on itempleó en ello una cantidad excesiva de tiempo/dinero

inordinate

[ɪnˈɔːrdɪnət] adj [amount, number] → disproportionné(e); [pleasure] → sans mesure; [pride] → démesuré(e), sans mesure
The idea gave me inordinate pleasure → Cette idée me procurait un plaisir sans mesure.
an inordinate length of time → un temps disproportionné, une durée disproportionnée

inordinate

adjunmäßig; number, size, sum of moneyübermäßig; demand, claim, fondnessübertrieben; to set inordinate store by somethingungeheuer or übertrieben viel Wert auf etw (acc)legen

inordinate

[ɪˈnɔːdɪnɪt] adjesagerato/a
References in classic literature ?
Now, see: under those seven gables, at which we now look up, --and which old Colonel Pyncheon meant to be the house of his descendants, in prosperity and happiness, down to an epoch far beyond the present,--under that roof, through a portion of three centuries, there has been perpetual remorse of conscience, a constantly defeated hope, strife amongst kindred, various misery, a strange form of death, dark suspicion, unspeakable disgrace, --all, or most of which calamity I have the means of tracing to the old Puritan's inordinate desire to plant and endow a family.
He never used to swear, though, at his men, they said; but somehow he got an inordinate quantity of cruel, unmitigated hard work out of them.
A most remarkable circumstance is, that I really don't think he grasped this sum even so much for the gratification of his avarice, which was inordinate, as in the hatred he felt for Copperfield.
So saying, on he led his radiant Files, Daz'ling the Moon; these to the Bower direct In search of whom they sought: him there they found Squat like a Toad, close at the eare of EVE; Assaying by his Devilish art to reach The Organs of her Fancie, and with them forge Illusions as he list, Phantasms and Dreams, Or if, inspiring venom, he might taint Th' animal Spirits that from pure blood arise Like gentle breaths from Rivers pure, thence raise At least distemperd, discontented thoughts, Vain hopes, vain aimes, inordinate desires Blown up with high conceits ingendring pride.
His father had been our ambassador at Madrid when Isabella was young and Prim unthought of, but had retired from the diplomatic service in a capricious moment of annoyance on not being offered the Embassy at Paris, a post to which he considered that he was fully entitled by reason of his birth, his indolence, the good English of his dispatches, and his inordinate passion for pleasure.
The inordinate pride of State importance has suggested to some minds an objection to the principle of a guaranty in the federal government, as involving an officious interference in the domestic concerns of the members.
A cadaverousness of complexion; an eye large, liquid, and luminous beyond comparison; lips somewhat thin and very pallid, but of a surpassingly beautiful curve; a nose of a delicate Hebrew model, but with a breadth of nostril unusual in similar formations; a finely-moulded chin, speaking, in its want of prominence, of a want of moral energy; hair of a more than web-like softness and tenuity; these features, with an inordinate expansion above the regions of the temple, made up altogether a countenance not easily to be forgotten.
And still the figure had no face by which he might know it; even in his dreams, it had no face, or one that baffled him and melted before his eyes; and thus it was that there sprang up and grew apace in the lawyer's mind a singularly strong, almost an inordinate, curiosity to behold the features of the real Mr.
She slid into the silence with a technicality, asking if John still took his old inordinate amount of sugar.
with a heap of papers calculated to alarm any one else, but which generally scarcely satisfied his inordinate desires.
I do not wish to discuss Heliogabalus, Macrinus, or Julian, who, being thoroughly contemptible, were quickly wiped out; but I will bring this discourse to a conclusion by saying that princes in our times have this difficulty of giving inordinate satisfaction to their soldiers in a far less degree, because, notwithstanding one has to give them some indulgence, that is soon done; none of these princes have armies that are veterans in the governance and administration of provinces, as were the armies of the Roman Empire; and whereas it was then more necessary to give satisfaction to the soldiers than to the people, it is now more necessary to all princes, except the Turk and the Soldan, to satisfy the people rather the soldiers, because the people are the more powerful.
As none could remember when he first took up the search, there went a fable in the valley of the Saco, that for his inordinate lust after the Great Carbuncle, he had been condemned to wander among the mountains till the end of time, still with the same feverish hopes at sunrise--the same despair at eve.