inorganic


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Related to inorganic: Inorganic compounds, Inorganic Acids

in·or·gan·ic

 (ĭn′ôr-găn′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Involving neither organic life nor the products of organic life.
b. Not composed of organic matter.
2. Chemistry Of or relating to compounds not containing hydrocarbon groups or derivatives.
3. Not arising in normal growth; artificial.
4. Lacking system or structure.

in′or·gan′i·cal·ly adv.

inorganic

(ˌɪnɔːˈɡænɪk)
adj
1. (Biology) not having the structure or characteristics of living organisms; not organic
2. (Chemistry) relating to or denoting chemical compounds that do not contain carbon. Compare organic4
3. not having a system, structure, or ordered relation of parts; amorphous
4. not resulting from or produced by growth; artificial
5. (Linguistics) linguistics denoting or relating to a sound or letter introduced into the pronunciation or spelling of a word at some point in its history
ˌinorˈganically adv

in•or•gan•ic

(ˌɪn ɔrˈgæn ɪk)

adj.
1. not having the structure or organization characteristic of living bodies.
2. not characterized by vital processes.
3. noting or pertaining to chemical compounds that are not hydrocarbons or their derivatives.
4. not fundamental or related; extraneous.
[1785–95]
in`or•gan′i•cal•ly, adv.

in·or·gan·ic

(ĭn′ôr-găn′ĭk)
1. Not involving organisms or the products of their life processes.
2. Relating to chemical compounds that do not contain carbon (and especially hydrocarbons). Inorganic compounds occur mainly outside of living or once living organisms. Some inorganic compounds, such as carbon dioxide, contain carbon, but most do not. Salt (NaCl) and ammonia (NH3) are typical inorganic compounds.

inorganic

Not relating to living organisms, or not containing hydrocarbon groups.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inorganic - relating or belonging to the class of compounds not having a carbon basis; "hydrochloric and sulfuric acids are called inorganic substances"
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
organic - relating or belonging to the class of chemical compounds having a carbon basis; "hydrocarbons are organic compounds"
2.inorganic - lacking the properties characteristic of living organisms
organic - being or relating to or derived from or having properties characteristic of living organisms; "organic life"; "organic growth"; "organic remains found in rock"

inorganic

adjective artificial, chemical, man-made, mineral roofing made from organic and inorganic fibres
Translations
غَير عُضْوي
anorganický
uorganisk
epäorgaaninen
anorganski
szervetlen
ólífrænn
neorganinis
neorganisks
anorganický
cansızinorganik

inorganic

[ˌɪnɔːˈgænɪk]
A. ADJ (Chem) → inorgánico
B. CPD inorganic chemistry Nquímica f inorgánica

inorganic

[ˌɪnɔːrˈgænɪk] adj [matter, material] → inorganique inorganic chemistryinorganic chemistry nchimie f inorganiquein-patient inpatient [ˈɪnpeɪʃənt]
nmalade mf hospitalisé(e)
She was treated as an in-patient → Elle a été hospitalisée.
modif [treatment, care] → hospitalier/ière; [waiting lists] → hospitalier/ière
inpatient care → soins mpl hospitaliers

inorganic

adjanorganisch; (fig)unorganisch

inorganic

[ˌɪnɔːˈgænɪk] adjinorganico/a

inorganic

(inoːˈgӕnik) adjective
not having the special characteristics of living bodies; not organic. Stone, metal and other minerals are inorganic.

in·or·gan·ic

a. inorgánico-a; que no pertenece a organismos vivos.

inorganic

adj inorgánico
References in classic literature ?
Hence it has been inferred that "the hours of darkness are as necessary to the inorganic creation as we know night and sleep are to the organic kingdom.
If thought could exercise its influence upon a living organism, might not thought exercise an influence upon dead and inorganic things?
He had now seen the full deformity of that creature that shared with him some of the phenomena of consciousness, and was co-heir with him to death: and beyond these links of community, which in themselves made the most poignant part of his distress, he thought of Hyde, for all his energy of life, as of something not only hellish but inorganic.
When I think of the sweet-tasted swans and other ingenious white shapes crunched by the small teeth of that rising generation, I am glad to remember that a certain amount of calcareous food has been held good for young creatures whose bones are not quite formed; for I have observed these delicacies to have an inorganic flavour which would have recommended them greatly to that young lady of the Spectator's acquaintance who habitually made her dessert on the stems of tobacco-pipes.
Had it built itself out of the cooling, inorganic elements of the globe?
Another year's instalment of flowers, leaves, nightingales, thrushes, finches, and such ephemeral creatures, took up their positions where only a year ago others had stood in their place when these were nothing more than germs and inorganic particles.
Hence the virtue and pungency of the influence on the mind of natural objects, whether inorganic or organized.
Oh, I mean the real interpretative biology, from the ground up, from the laboratory and the test-tube and the vitalized inorganic right on up to the widest aesthetic and sociological generalizations.
It may be said that natural selection is daily and hourly scrutinising, throughout the world, every variation, even the slightest; rejecting that which is bad, preserving and adding up all that is good; silently and insensibly working, whenever and wherever opportunity offers, at the improvement of each organic being in relation to its organic and inorganic conditions of life.
When we remember that lime, either as a phosphate or carbonate, enters into the composition of the hard parts, such as bones and shells, of all living animals, it is an interesting physiological fact [6] to find substances harder than the enamel of teeth, and coloured surfaces as well polished as those of a fresh shell, reformed through inorganic means from dead organic matter -- mocking, also, in shape, some of the lower vegetable productions.
His power consists in the multitude of his affinities, in the fact that his life is intertwined with the whole chain of organic and inorganic being.
But that is a matter of inorganic chemistry, you say.