inquisition

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in·qui·si·tion

 (ĭn′kwĭ-zĭsh′ən, ĭng′-)
n.
1. The act of inquiring into a matter; an investigation. See Synonyms at inquiry.
2. Law An inquest.
3.
a. Inquisition A tribunal formerly held in the Roman Catholic Church and directed at the suppression of heresy.
b. An investigation that violates the privacy or rights of individuals, especially through rigorous or harsh interrogation.
c. A rigorous or severe questioning: "Looking pained at having to endure another inquisition [from the press, the football coach] assumed his usual monotone as he parried questions" (Judy Battista).

[Middle English inquisicioun, from Old French inquisicion, from Latin inquīsītiō, inquīsītiōn-, from inquīsītus, past participle of inquīrere, to inquire; see inquire.]

in′qui·si′tion·al adj.

inquisition

(ˌɪnkwɪˈzɪʃən)
n
1. the act of inquiring deeply or searchingly; investigation
2. a deep or searching inquiry, esp a ruthless official investigation of individuals in order to suppress revolt or root out the unorthodox
3. (Law) an official inquiry, esp one held by a jury before an officer of the Crown
4. (Law) another word for inquest2
[C14: from legal Latin inquīsītiō, from inquīrere to seek for; see inquire]
ˌinquiˈsitional adj
ˌinquiˈsitionist n

Inquisition

(ˌɪnkwɪˈzɪʃən)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) history a judicial institution of the Roman Catholic Church (1232–1820) founded to discover and suppress heresy. See also Spanish Inquisition

in•qui•si•tion

(ˌɪn kwəˈzɪʃ ən, ˌɪŋ-)

n.
1. an official investigation, esp. one of a political or religious nature, characterized by lack of regard for individual rights, prejudice on the part of the examiners, and recklessly cruel punishments.
2. any harsh, difficult, or prolonged questioning.
3. the act of inquiring.
4. an investigation, or process of inquiry.
5. a judicial or official inquiry.
6. the document embodying the result of such inquiry.
7. (cap.) Rom. Cath. Ch. a former special tribunal, engaged chiefly in combating and punishing heresy.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin inquīsītiō search, investigation, derivative of inquīsī-, variant s. of inquīrere to inquire]
in`qui•si′tion•al, adj.

Inquisition

(Holy Office) A Roman Catholic tribunal concerned with investigating and punishing heresy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inquisition - a former tribunal of the Roman Catholic Church (1232-1820) created to discover and suppress heresyInquisition - a former tribunal of the Roman Catholic Church (1232-1820) created to discover and suppress heresy
court, judicature, tribunal - an assembly (including one or more judges) to conduct judicial business
2.inquisition - a severe interrogation (often violating the rights or privacy of individuals)
interrogatory, examination, interrogation - formal systematic questioning

inquisition

noun investigation, questioning, examination, inquiry, grilling (informal), quizzing, inquest, cross-examination, third degree (informal) He suffered a 40-minute inquisition in the press conference.

inquisition

noun
A seeking of knowledge, data, or the truth about something:
Translations

inquisition

[ˌɪnkwɪˈzɪʃən] Ninquisición f, investigación f
the Spanish Inquisitionla Inquisición, el Santo Oficio

Inquisition

[ˌɪŋkwɪˈzɪʃən] n (RELIGION) the Inquisition → l'Inquisition f

inquisition

[ˌɪŋkwɪˈzɪʃən] n (= interrogation) → interrogatoire m en règle

inquisition

n
(Hist Eccl) the Inquisitiondie Inquisition
(Jur) → Untersuchung f
(fig)Inquisition f, → Verhör nt

Inquisition

[ˌɪnkwɪˈzɪʃn] n (Rel) the Inquisitionl'Inquisizione f

inquisition

[ˌɪnkwɪˈzɪʃn] ninquisizione f
References in classic literature ?
If anything was to happen to me, I don't want the Norwegians holding inquisitions over me to see whether I'm good enough to be laid amongst 'em.
The ancient Surveyor -- being little molested, suppose, at that early day with business pertaining to his office -- seems to have devoted some of his many leisure hours to researches as a local antiquarian, and other inquisitions of a similar nature.
Persons of a figure remotely reconcilable with his were subjected to quite extraordinary inquisitions, made to scrub their faces before going on board ship, as if each white complexion were made up like a mask, of greasepaint.
Well for our northern friend, Dame Isabella's Inquisition wanes in Lima," laughed Don Sebastian.
On the reverse of that draft, so obtained, let them write these words of the great Paymaster, to whom they shall make up their account in a future day: "When he maketh inquisition for blood, he forgetteth not the cry of the humble
The Charter of the Forest designed to lessen those evils, declares that inquisition, or view, for lawing dogs, shall be made every third year, and shall be then done by the view and testimony of lawful men, not otherwise; and they whose dogs shall be then found unlawed, shall give three shillings for mercy, and for the future no man's ox shall be taken for lawing.
I conjured him "to conceal from all persons what I had told him of the HOUYHNHNMS; because the least hint of such a story would not only draw numbers of people to see me, but probably put me in danger of being imprisoned, or burnt by the Inquisition.
Let us suppose an inhabitant of some remote and superior region, yet unskilled in the ways of men, having read and considered the precepts of the gospel, and the example of our Saviour, to come down in search of the true church: if he would not inquire after it among the cruel, the insolent, and the oppressive; among those who are continually grasping at dominion over souls as well as bodies; among those who are employed in procuring to themselves impunity for the most enormous villainies, and studying methods of destroying their fellow-creatures, not for their crimes but their errors; if he would not expect to meet benevolence, engage in massacres, or to find mercy in a court of inquisition, he would not look for the true church in the Church of Rome.
We remained six days in Velez, at the end of which the renegade, having informed himself of all that was requisite for him to do, set out for the city of Granada to restore himself to the sacred bosom of the Church through the medium of the Holy Inquisition.
The notion had no ground in sense; it was probably no more than a reminiscence of similar calamities in childhood, for his father's room had always been the chamber of inquisition and the scene of punishment; but it stuck so rigorously in his mind that he must instantly approach the door and prove its untruth.
When I have returned you will be master of all the facts, and we can then better enter on our inquisition.
Such creatures as the Siamese Twins--And in the vaults of the Inquisition.