inquisitorially


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in·quis·i·to·ri·al

 (ĭn-kwĭz′ĭ-tôr′ē-əl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or having the function of an inquisitor.
2. Law Relating to a legal proceeding in which the judge is both actively involved in determining the facts and in deciding the outcome.
3. Extremely inquisitive or prying: "a sharp inquisitorial gaze" (Michael Chabon).

in·quis′i·to′ri·al·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Disinclined to fashion a (more inquisitorially inspired) rule imposing an "undifferentiated and absolute duty to retain and to preserve all material that might be of conceivable evidentiary significance in a particular prosecution," the Court deferred to "police themselves" to "by their conduct indicate that the evidence could form a basis for exonerating the defendant.
99) Most inquisitorially oriented systems also include adversarial elements.
This is in great contrast to civil law trials that are inquisitorially managed by an active judge.