insider trading


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insider trading

n.
The illegal buying or selling of securities on the basis of information that is unavailable to the public.

in′sider trad′ing


n.
the illegal buying and selling of securities by persons acting on privileged information.
[1965–70]
in′sider trad′er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.insider trading - buying or selling corporate stock by a corporate officer or other insider on the basis of information that has not been made public and is supposed to remain confidential
trading - buying or selling securities or commodities
References in periodicals archive ?
It cannot show that it is always wrong, either legally or morally, for insiders to trade on material, non-public information, but only that it is wrong in the absence of bona fide agreements to allow insider trading.
More particularly, it investigates the policy recommendations that economists give, with a special focus on whether insider trading should be regulated and whether the government should be the main force behind the regulation.
In fact, the US government investigated Mickelson for alleged insider trading not long time ago.
Supreme Court unanimously and 'easily' rejected the Second Circuit's novel reinterpretation of insider trading law in U.
BANKING AND CREDIT NEWS-October 13, 2016-BasisCode releases insider trading software solution
M2 EQUITYBITES-October 13, 2016-BasisCode releases insider trading software solution
Summary: SEBI overhauls insider trading regulations to make the markets safer and more transparent.
We agree that the jury instruction was erroneous because we conclude that, in order to sustain a conviction for insider trading, the government must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the tippee knew that an insider disclosed confidential information and that he did so in exchange for a personal benefit.
A quarter of all public company deals may involve some kind of insider trading, according to a working paper by Patrick Augustin of McGill University, and Menachem Brenner and Marti G.
This two-hour webinar offers an in-depth discussion of the latest enforcement efforts, legal developments in insider trading and an overview of how an economist can help when there are allegations of insider trading.
Such indirect insider trading imposes substantial costs on public investors in two ways: by systematically diverting value to insiders and by inducing insiders to take steps that destroy economic value.
This decision has the potential to affect future insider trading cases and provides the government to hold money managers accountable for profits generated from firms.