insidious


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in·sid·i·ous

 (ĭn-sĭd′ē-əs)
adj.
1. Working or spreading harmfully in a subtle or stealthy manner: insidious rumors; an insidious disease.
2. Intended to entrap; treacherous: insidious misinformation.
3. Beguiling but harmful; alluring: insidious pleasures.

[From Latin īnsidiōsus, from īnsidiae, ambush, from īnsidēre, to sit upon, lie in wait for : in-, in, on; see in-2 + sedēre, to sit; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

in·sid′i·ous·ly adv.
in·sid′i·ous·ness n.

insidious

(ɪnˈsɪdɪəs)
adj
1. stealthy, subtle, cunning, or treacherous
2. working in a subtle or apparently innocuous way, but nevertheless deadly: an insidious illness.
[C16: from Latin insidiōsus cunning, from insidiae an ambush, from insidēre to sit in; see insessorial]
inˈsidiously adv
inˈsidiousness n

in•sid•i•ous

(ɪnˈsɪd i əs)

adj.
1. intended to entrap or beguile: an insidious plan.
2. stealthily treacherous or deceitful: an insidious enemy.
3. operating or proceeding inconspicuously but with grave effect: an insidious disease.
[1535–45; < Latin insidiōsus deceitful, derivative of insidi(ae) (pl.) an ambush, derivative of insidēre to sit in or on]
in•sid′i•ous•ly, adv.
in•sid′i•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.insidious - beguiling but harmful; "insidious pleasures"
seductive - tending to entice into a desired action or state
2.insidious - intended to entrap
dangerous, unsafe - involving or causing danger or risk; liable to hurt or harm; "a dangerous criminal"; "a dangerous bridge"; "unemployment reached dangerous proportions"
3.insidious - working or spreading in a hidden and usually injurious way; "glaucoma is an insidious disease"; "a subtle poison"
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"

insidious

Translations

insidious

[ɪnˈsɪdɪəs] ADJinsidioso

insidious

[ɪnˈsɪdiəs] adjinsidieux/euse

insidious

adj, insidiously

insidious

[ɪnˈsɪdɪəs] adjinsidioso/a

in·sid·i·ous

a. insidioso-a, rel. a una enfermedad que se desarrolla gradualmente sin producir síntomas obvios.
References in classic literature ?
They were designed for winter wear, when treacherous drafts came down chimneys and insidious currents of deadly cold found their way through key-holes.
Heyward withdrew to the rampart, too uneasy and too little accustomed to the warfare of the woods to remain at ease under the possibility of such insidious attacks.
Could they be other than the insidious whispers of the bad angel, who would fain have persuaded the struggling woman, as yet only half his victim, that the outward guise of purity was but a lie, and that, if truth were everywhere to be shown, a scarlet letter would blaze forth on many a bosom besides Hester Prynne's?
She was from New England, and knew well the first guileful footsteps of that soft, insidious disease, which sweeps away so many of the fairest and loveliest, and, before one fibre of life seems broken, seals them irrevocably for death.
Dixon, and the not going to Ireland, she said, with the insidious design of farther discovery,
In these days of insidious nervous exhaustion and subtly-spreading nervous malady, is it not possible that the same rule may apply, less rarely than we are willing to admit, to the bodily gifts as well?
The voice without a body went on singing; and certainly Raoul had never in his life heard anything more absolutely and heroically sweet, more gloriously insidious, more delicate, more powerful, in short, more irresistibly triumphant.
With the same insidious views, they now seduced the members from the league, by representing to their pride the violation it committed on their sovereignty.
Let us rather no longer insult them with the supposition that they can ever reduce themselves to the necessity of making the experiment, by a blind and tame submission to the long train of insidious measures which must precede and produce it.
They were short days, for into them were crowded many hours of insidious instruction of the unlettered child by the lonely woman.
There was scrub and long grass all about us, and I did not feel safe from their insidious approach.
If in the neighborhood of your camp there should be any hilly country, ponds surrounded by aquatic grass, hollow basins filled with reeds, or woods with thick undergrowth, they must be carefully routed out and searched; for these are places where men in ambush or insidious spies are likely to be lurking.