insipid


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in·sip·id

 (ĭn-sĭp′ĭd)
adj.
1. Lacking flavor or zest; not tasty: insipid soup.
2. Lacking qualities that excite, stimulate, or interest; dull.

[French insipide, from Late Latin īnsipidus : Latin in-, not; see in-1 + Latin sapidus, savory (from sapere, to taste; see sep- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots).]

in′si·pid′i·ty (ĭn′sĭ-pĭd′ĭ-tē), in·sip′id·ness n.
in·sip′id·ly adv.

insipid

(ɪnˈsɪpɪd)
adj
1. lacking spirit; boring
2. lacking taste; unpalatable
[C17: from Latin insipidus, from in-1 + sapidus full of flavour, sapid]
ˌinsiˈpidity, inˈsipidness n
inˈsipidly adv

in•sip•id

(ɪnˈsɪp ɪd)

adj.
1. without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2. without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.
[1610–20; < Late Latin insipidus= Latin in- in-3 + -sipidus, comb. form of sapidus tasty; see sage1]
in`si•pid′i•ty, in•sip′id•ness, n.
in•sip′id•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.insipid - lacking taste or flavor or tanginsipid - lacking taste or flavor or tang; "a bland diet"; "insipid hospital food"; "flavorless supermarket tomatoes"; "vapid beer"; "vapid tea"
tasteless - lacking flavor
2.insipid - lacking interest or significance or impact; "an insipid personality"; "jejune novel"
uninteresting - arousing no interest or attention or curiosity or excitement; "a very uninteresting account of her trip"

insipid

adjective
1. tasteless, bland, flavourless, watered down, watery, wishy-washy (informal), unappetizing, savourless It tasted bland and insipid, like warm cardboard.
tasteless tasty, savoury, pungent, fiery, palatable, piquant, appetizing
2. bland, boring, dull, flat, dry, weak, stupid, limp, tame, pointless, tedious, stale, drab, banal, tiresome, lifeless, prosaic, trite, unimaginative, colourless, uninteresting, anaemic, wishy-washy (informal), ho-hum (informal), vapid, wearisome, characterless, spiritless, jejune, prosy On the surface she seemed meek, rather bland and insipid. They gave an insipid opening performance in a nil-nil draw.
bland interesting, exciting, stimulating, spirited, engaging, lively, colourful, provocative

insipid

adjective
1. Lacking an appetizing flavor:
2. Lacking the qualities requisite for spiritedness and originality:
Informal: wishy-washy.
Translations
mielenkiinnotonvalju

insipid

[ɪnˈsɪpɪd] ADJinsípido, soso

insipid

[ɪnˈsɪpɪd] adj
[taste, colour] → insipide
[person] → insipide

insipid

adjfade; colourlangweilig; (= vapid) person, novel, lyricsgeistlos

insipid

[ɪnˈsɪpɪd] adj (food, drink) → insipido/a (fig) → insulso/a, insipido/a

insipid

a. insípido-a, sin sabor;
pop. soso-a.
References in classic literature ?
But in Europe everywhere except in the mountains, the water is flat and insipid beyond the power of words to describe.
He had to eat with a knife and fork; he had to use napkin, cup, and plate; he had to learn his book, he had to go to church; he had to talk so properly that speech was become insipid in his mouth; whitherso- ever he turned, the bars and shackles of civilization shut him in and bound him hand and foot.
This sensation of listlessness, weariness, stupidity, this disinclination to sit down and employ myself, this feeling of every thing's being dull and insipid about the house
You decide on his imperfections so much in the mass," replied Elinor, "and so much on the strength of your own imagination, that the commendation I am able to give of him is comparatively cold and insipid.
It is my opinion the fiddler David must have been an insipid sort of fellow; I like black Bothwell better: to my mind a man is nothing without a spice of the devil in him; and history may say what it will of James Hepburn, but I have a notion, he was just the sort of wild, fierce, bandit hero whom I could have consented to gift with my hand.
And that insipid, paltry creature attending her from DUTY and HUMANITY
By a dexterous piece of mimicry, she had made a living reality of one of the most insipid characters in the English drama; and she had roused to enthusiasm an audience of two hundred exiles from the blessings of ventilation, all simmering together in their own animal heat.
It was at first a very insipid diet, though common enough in many parts of Europe, but grew tolerable by time; and having been often reduced to hard fare in my life, this was not the first experiment I had made how easily nature is satisfied.
He suffered much from a morbid acuteness of the senses; the most insipid food was alone endurable; he could wear only garments of certain texture; the odours of all flowers were oppressive; his eyes were tortured by even a faint light; and there were but peculiar sounds, and these from stringed instruments, which did not inspire him with horror.
I had imagined, on the contrary, that on coming in he would at once break into his habitual thin, shrill laugh and fall to making his insipid jokes and witticisms.
She was not of so ungovernable a temper as Lydia; and, removed from the influence of Lydia's example, she became, by proper attention and management, less irritable, less ignorant, and less insipid.
The news that "Bony" was come back from Egypt was comparatively insipid, and the repulse of the French in Italy was nothing to Mrs.