insolence


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in·so·lent

 (ĭn′sə-lənt)
adj.
1. Audaciously rude or disrespectful; impertinent or impudent.
2. Archaic Presumptuous and insulting in manner or speech; arrogant.

[Middle English, from Latin īnsolēns, īnsolent-, immoderate, arrogant : in-, not; see in-1 + solēns, present participle of solēre, to be accustomed.]

in′so·lence (-ləns) n.
in′so·lent·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.insolence - the trait of being rude and impertinent; inclined to take liberties
rudeness, discourtesy - a manner that is rude and insulting
chutzpa, chutzpah, hutzpah - (Yiddish) unbelievable gall; insolence; audacity
2.insolence - an offensive disrespectful impudent act
offense, offensive activity, discourtesy, offence - a lack of politeness; a failure to show regard for others; wounding the feelings or others

insolence

noun rudeness, cheek (informal), disrespect, front, abuse, sauce (informal), gall (informal), audacity, boldness, chutzpah (U.S. & Canad. informal), insubordination, impertinence, impudence, effrontery, backchat (informal), incivility, sassiness (U.S. informal), pertness, contemptuousness The most frequent reason for excluding a pupil was insolence.
respect, esteem, deference, courtesy, submission, politeness, civility, mannerliness

insolence

noun
Translations
وقاحَه، إهانَه
drzost
uforskammethed
ósvífni
predrznost
küstahlık

insolence

[ˈɪnsələns] Ninsolencia f

insolence

[ˈɪnsələns] ninsolence f

insolence

nUnverschämtheit f, → Frechheit f; the insolence of it!so eine Unverschämtheit or Frechheit!

insolence

[ˈɪnsləns] ninsolenza

insolent

(ˈinsələnt) adjective
(of a person or his behaviour) insulting or offensive. an insolent stare/remark.
ˈinsolently adverb
ˈinsolence noun
References in classic literature ?
He was, therefore, fain to adopt a caution that in the present temper of his mind he execrated, and to listen to advice at which his fiery spirit chafed, under the vivid recollection of Cora's danger and Magua's insolence.
That I do not despair is because I know also the forces that are driving behind you--because I know the raging lash of poverty, the sting of contempt and mastership, 'the insolence of office and the spurns.
I take it none of YOU are unpopular -- by reason of pride or insolence, or conspicuous prosperity, or any of those things that excite envy and malice among the base scum of a village?
The studied indifference, insolence, and discontent of her husband gave her no pain; and when he scolded or abused her, she was highly diverted.
His peevish reproofs wakened in her a naughty delight to provoke him: she was never so happy as when we were all scolding her at once, and she defying us with her bold, saucy look, and her ready words; turning Joseph's religious curses into ridicule, baiting me, and doing just what her father hated most - showing how her pretended insolence, which he thought real, had more power over Heathcliff than his kindness: how the boy would do HER bidding in anything, and HIS only when it suited his own inclination.
His object appears to be to assert once more his audacious claim to a family connection with my poor mother, under cover of a letter of condolence; which it is an insolence in such a person to have written at all.
He had taken little or no wine; and I presume it was the mere insolence of triumph that was upon him, flushed perhaps by the temptation my presence furnished to its exhibition.
Were you not old, I would beat you for your insolence," said Nada, striving to look brave and all the while searching a way to escape.
In Courts and Palaces he also Reigns And in luxurious Cities, where the noyse Of riot ascends above thir loftiest Towrs, And injury and outrage: And when Night Darkens the Streets, then wander forth the Sons Of BELIAL, flown with insolence and wine.
A truce to thine insolence, fellow,'' said the armed rider, breaking in on his prattle with a high and stern voice, ``and tell us, if thou canst, the road to How call'd you your Franklin, Prior Aymer?
And you're the last above board of that same meddling crew; and you have the Davy Jones's insolence to up and stand for cap'n over me--you, that sank the lot of us
The palace of a chief minister is a seminary to breed up others in his own trade: the pages, lackeys, and porters, by imitating their master, become ministers of state in their several districts, and learn to excel in the three principal ingredients, of insolence, lying, and bribery.