insolent


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Related to insolent: impertinent

in·so·lent

 (ĭn′sə-lənt)
adj.
1. Audaciously rude or disrespectful; impertinent or impudent.
2. Archaic Presumptuous and insulting in manner or speech; arrogant.

[Middle English, from Latin īnsolēns, īnsolent-, immoderate, arrogant : in-, not; see in-1 + solēns, present participle of solēre, to be accustomed.]

in′so·lence (-ləns) n.
in′so·lent·ly adv.

insolent

(ˈɪnsələnt)
adj
offensive, impudent, or disrespectful
[C14: from Latin insolens, from in-1 + solēre to be accustomed]
ˈinsolence n
ˈinsolently adv

in•so•lent

(ˈɪn sə lənt)

adj.
1. boldly rude or disrespectful; contemptuously impertinent.
n.
2. an insolent person.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin insolēns unaccustomed, immoderate, haughty =in- in-3 + solēns, present participle of solēre to be accustomed]
in′so•lence, n.
in′so•lent•ly, adv.
syn: See impertinent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.insolent - marked by casual disrespect; "a flip answer to serious question"; "the student was kept in for impudent behavior"
disrespectful - exhibiting lack of respect; rude and discourteous; "remarks disrespectful of the law"; "disrespectful in the presence of his parents"; "disrespectful toward his teacher"
2.insolent - unrestrained by convention or proprietyinsolent - unrestrained by convention or propriety; "an audacious trick to pull"; "a barefaced hypocrite"; "the most bodacious display of tourism this side of Anaheim"- Los Angeles Times; "bald-faced lies"; "brazen arrogance"; "the modern world with its quick material successes and insolent belief in the boundless possibilities of progress"- Bertrand Russell
unashamed - used of persons or their behavior; feeling no shame

insolent

insolent

adjective
Translations
وَقِح، مُهين
drzý
uforskammet
ósvífinn
užgaulumas
apvainojošsnekaunīgs
predrzen

insolent

[ˈɪnsələnt] ADJinsolente

insolent

[ˈɪnsələnt] adjinsolent(e)
to be insolent to sb → se montrer insolent(e) envers qn

insolent

adj, insolently

insolent

[ˈɪnslənt] adjinsolente

insolent

(ˈinsələnt) adjective
(of a person or his behaviour) insulting or offensive. an insolent stare/remark.
ˈinsolently adverb
ˈinsolence noun
References in classic literature ?
Will he bear about with him,--no odious grin of feigned benignity, insolent in its pretence, and loathsome in its falsehood,--but the tender sadness of a contrite heart, broken, at last, beneath its own weight of sin?
Meanwhile Ahab half smothered in the foam of the whale's insolent tail, and too much of a cripple to swim, --though he could still keep afloat, even in the heart of such a whirlpool as that; helpless Ahab's head was seen, like a tossed bubble which the least chance shock might burst.
They were of the triumphant and insolent possessors; they had a hall, and a fire, and food and clothing and money, and so they might preach to hungry men, and the hungry men must be humble and listen
IF they did escape, then are we bound in duty to lay hands upon them and deliver them again to their lord; for it is not seemly that one of his quality should suffer a so insolent and high-handed outrage from persons of their base degree.
You are from a land where any insolent that wants to is privileged to profane and insult Nature, and, through her, Nature's God, if by so doing he can put a sordid penny in his pocket.
Because my innocent pure girl here at my side wouldn't marry that rich, insolent, ignorant coward, Brace Dunlap, who's been sniveling here over a brother he never cared a brass farthing for--"[I see Tom give a jump and look glad THIS time, to a dead certainty]"-- and in that moment I've told you about, I forgot my God and remembered only my heart's bitterness, God forgive me, and I struck to kill.
In this state Frank Churchill had found her, she trembling and conditioning, they loud and insolent.
Georgiana, who had a spoiled temper, a very acrid spite, a captious and insolent carriage, was universally indulged.
He was not insolent to his benefactor, he was simply insensible; though knowing perfectly the hold he had on his heart, and conscious he had only to speak and all the house would be obliged to bend to his wishes.
She had expected -- founding her anticipations on the letter which the housekeeper had written to her -- to see a hard, wily, ill-favored, insolent old woman.
Carton's manner was so careless as to be almost insolent.
Then, Drummle glanced at me, with an insolent triumph on his great-jowled face that cut me to the heart, dull as he was, and so exasperated me, that I felt inclined to take him in my arms (as the robber in the story-book is said to have taken the old lady), and seat him on the fire.