insouciant


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in·sou·ci·ant

 (ĭn-so͞o′sē-ənt, ăN′so͞o-syäN′)
adj.
Marked by blithe unconcern; nonchalant.

[French : in-, not (from Old French; see in-1) + souciant, present participle of soucier, to trouble (from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *sollicītāre, alteration of Latin sollicitāre, to vex; see solicit).]

in·sou′ci·ant·ly adv.

insouciant

(ɪnˈsuːsɪənt)
adj
carefree or unconcerned; light-hearted
[C19: from French, from in-1 + souciant worrying, from soucier to trouble, from Latin sollicitāre; compare solicitous]
inˈsouciance n
inˈsouciantly adv

in•sou•ci•ant

(ɪnˈsu si ənt; Fr. ɛ̃ suˈsyɑ̃)

adj.
free from concern, worry, or anxiety; carefree; nonchalant.
[1820–30; < French, =in- in-3 + souciant, present participle of soucier to worry < Vulgar Latin *sollicītāre, for Latin sollicitāre to disturb; see solicit]
in•sou′ci•ant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.insouciant - marked by blithe unconcerninsouciant - marked by blithe unconcern; "an ability to interest casual students"; "showed a casual disregard for cold weather"; "an utterly insouciant financial policy"; "an elegantly insouciant manner"; "drove his car with nonchalant abandon"; "was polite in a teasing nonchalant manner"
unconcerned - lacking in interest or care or feeling; "the average American...is unconcerned that his or her plight is the result of a complex of personal and economic and governmental actions...beyond the normal citizen's comprehension and control"; "blithely unconcerned about his friend's plight"

insouciant

adjective nonchalant, casual, carefree, gay, sunny, buoyant, airy, breezy, unconcerned, jaunty, untroubled, happy-go-lucky, free and easy, unworried, light-hearted He worked with insouciant disregard for convention.
Translations

insouciant

[ɪnˈsuːsɪənt] ADJdespreocupado

insouciant

[ɪnˈsuːsiənt] (formal) adj (= nonchalant) → insouciant(e)

insouciant

adj (liter: = careless) → unbekümmert; to be insouciant about somethingsich nicht um etw kümmern

insouciant

[ɪnˈsuːsɪənt] adj (liter) → noncurante
References in classic literature ?
The ladies of Watteau, gay and insouciant, seemed to wander with their cavaliers among the great trees, whispering to one another careless, charming things, and yet somehow oppressed by a nameless fear.
Don't think: Everything old is new again: Except for a few glib drips of 21st-century insouciant attitude, this retro cartoon wouldn't have been out of place in the '50s.
April 6 /PRNewswire/ -- In response to the growing national controversy over whether to "recognize" same-sex relationships (and in keeping with its insouciant corporate philosophy, People Who Bathe Together Stay Together), soap importer Baudelaire, Inc.
The energetic and ebullient Litton was also the soloist in Gershwin's piano concerto and played with tremendous swagger and assurance right from his opening insouciant Chico Marx-style run up the keyboard.
Offstage this year, the San Francisco Ballet stumbled with an insouciant advertising campaign that promised youthful, affluent, leisure-driven dot-commers (be there any still around) exotic explorations of the flesh for the price of a ticket.
I haven't seen Glentoran play, but I'm told they can move fluidly between a 4-3-3 and a 4-5-1 formation that allows the ball to stay on the ground at all times, shifted with one touch and an insouciant grace.
But this is no insouciant display of Bond's prowess, since he is captured and interrogated under varying forms of torture for 14 months, according to the on-screen title.
It's true that his paintings dredge up styles from the past, and lots of them at that, but he neither invokes them as eternal verities nor toys with them with insouciant lightness.
I wish those commentators who habitually resort to insouciant facetiousness (J A McGrath, who was on duty for the Tote Gold Trophy, never does) would realise that the defeat of a good thing-of any thing, in fact-is not a subject for humour.
Better Than Chocolate is polished and insouciant and boasts the flashiest club numbers since The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.
As he proceeds to look into this crime, investigating magistrate Bocchi soon finds that he has not too few but far too many suspects from the city's rich and successful-all with reasons for killing the charming but insouciant Pagani.
Apparently the sole justification for this insouciant appendage is that the entrance looks somehow incomplete without it.