instep


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in·step

 (ĭn′stĕp′)
n.
1. The arched middle part of the human foot between the toes and the ankle.
2. The part of a shoe or stocking covering the instep.

[Middle English.]

instep

(ˈɪnˌstɛp)
n
1. (Anatomy) the middle section of the human foot, forming the arch between the ankle and toes
2. (Clothing & Fashion) the part of a shoe, stocking, etc, covering this
[C16: probably from in-2 + step]

in•step

(ˈɪnˌstɛp)

n.
1. the arched upper surface of the human foot between the toes and the ankle.
2. the part of a shoe, stocking, etc., covering this surface.
3. the front of the hind leg of a horse, cow, etc., between the hock and the pastern joint; cannon.
[1520–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.instep - the arch of the footinstep - the arch of the foot      
foot, human foot, pes - the part of the leg of a human being below the ankle joint; "his bare feet projected from his trousers"; "armored from head to foot"
arch - a curved bony structure supporting or enclosing organs (especially the inner sides of the feet)
fallen arch, sunken arch - an instep flattened so the entire sole rests on the ground
2.instep - the part of a shoe or stocking that covers the arch of the foot
boot - footwear that covers the whole foot and lower leg
covering - an artifact that covers something else (usually to protect or shelter or conceal it)
shoe - footwear shaped to fit the foot (below the ankle) with a flexible upper of leather or plastic and a sole and heel of heavier material
stocking - close-fitting hosiery to cover the foot and leg; come in matched pairs (usually used in the plural)
Translations
وَجْه القَدَم
nárt
vrist
rüszt
rist
kiltis
ayağın üst kısmı

instep

[ˈɪnstep] Nempeine m

instep

[ˈɪnstɛp] n
[foot] → cou-de-pied m, cambrure f
[shoe] → cou-de-pied m, cambrure f

instep

n
(Anat) → Spann m, → Rist m
(of shoe)Blatt nt

instep

[ˈɪnˌstɛp] n (of foot) → collo del piede; (of shoe) → collo della scarpa

instep

(ˈinstep) noun
the arched upper part of the foot. The strap of that shoe is too tight across the instep.

in·step

n. empeine, parte anterior del pie.

instep

n empeine m (del pie)
References in classic literature ?
Of course that's only his way of talking, for after all I only wear a number two, but these French heels and pointed toes do certainly make your foot look smaller, and it's always said a high instep helps, too.
Once more Mowgli stared, as he had stared at the rebellious cubs, full into the beryl-green eyes till the red glare behind their green went out like the light of a lighthouse shut off twenty miles across the sea; till the eyes dropped, and the big head with them--dropped lower and lower, and the red rasp of a tongue grated on Mowgli's instep.
Her slippers were of the same colour, with black bows at the instep.
I could distinguish the outline of an instep where the wet foot had been placed in coming in.
But near the instep there is a small circular wafer of paper with the shopman's hieroglyphics upon it.
But coming as the invitation did at the particular juncture when fear and indignation at these adversaries could be transformed by a spring of the foot into a triumph over them, she abandoned herself to her impulse, climbed the gate, put her toe upon his instep, and scrambled into the saddle behind him.
Then Robin took his good yew bow in his hand, and placing the tip at his instep, he strung it right deftly; then he nocked a broad clothyard arrow and, raising the bow, drew the gray goose feather to his ear; the next moment the bowstring rang and the arrow sped down the glade as a sparrowhawk skims in a northern wind.
The instep of his foot caught Michael squarely under the chest, half knocking the breath out of him and wholly lifting him into the air, so that he fell heavily on his side.
At the command of the bailiff they plucked off the fellow's shoe, and there sure enough at the side of the instep, wrapped in a piece of fine sendall, lay a long, dark splinter of wood.
Observation tells me that you have a little reddish mould adhering to your instep.
On the first-floor landing a marble woman, decently covered from neck to instep with stone draperies, advanced a row of lifeless toes to the edge of the pedestal, and thrust out blindly a rigid white arm holding a cluster of lights.
The mosquitoes made merry over her, biting her firm, round arms and nipping at her bare insteps.