institutes


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in·sti·tute

 (ĭn′stĭ-to͞ot′, -tyo͞ot′)
tr.v. in·sti·tut·ed, in·sti·tut·ing, in·sti·tutes
1.
a. To establish, organize, or introduce: institute wage and price controls. See Synonyms at establish.
b. To initiate; begin: institute a search for the missing hikers.
2. To establish or invest (someone) in an office or position.
n.
1. An organization founded to promote a cause: a cancer research institute.
2.
a. An educational institution, especially one for the instruction of technical subjects.
b. The building or buildings housing such an institution.
3. A usually short, intensive workshop or seminar on a specific subject.
4. Archaic
a. A principle or rudiment of a particular subject.
b. institutes A digest of or commentary on such principles or rudiments, especially a legal abstract.

[Middle English instituten, from Latin īnstituere, īnstitūt-, to establish : in-, in; see in-2 + statuere, to set up; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

in′sti·tut′er, in′sti·tu′tor n.

institutes

(ˈɪnstɪˌtjuːts)
pl n
(Law) a digest or summary, esp of laws

Institutes

(ˈɪnstɪˌtjuːts)
pl n
1. (Law) an introduction to legal study in ancient Rome, compiled by order of Justinian and divided into four books forming part of the Corpus Juris Civilis
2. (Historical Terms) short for Institutes of the Christian Religion, the book by Calvin, completed in 1536 and constituting the basic statement of the Reformed faith, that repudiates papal authority and postulates the doctrines of justification by faith alone and predestination
References in classic literature ?
At Speranski's request he took the first part of the Civil Code that was being drawn up and, with the aid of the Code Napoleon and the Institutes of Justinian, he worked at formulating the section on Personal Rights.
A powerful, intellectual analysis of some well-marked subject, in such form as makes literature enduring, is indeed what the world might have looked for from him: those institutes of aesthetics, for instance, which might exist, after Lessing and Hegel, but which certainly do not exist yet.
Nature, always abhorring monotony, institutes reserves of temper as elements in the composition of the gentlest women living.
In all the new-fangled comprehensive plans which I see, this is all left out; and the consequence is, that your great mechanics' institutes end in intellectual priggism, and your Christian young men's societies in religious Pharisaism.
of Quinctilian's Institutes, and of Cicero's Orations by Poggio in the monastery of St.
Veneering institutes an original comparison between the country, and a ship; pointedly calling the ship, the Vessel of the State, and the Minister the Man at the Helm.
It was committed in the presence of slaves, and they of course could neither institute a suit, nor testify against him; and thus the guilty perpetrator of one of the bloodiest and most foul murders goes unwhipped of justice, and uncensured by the community in which he lives.
In that instrument, the right to institute and to alter governments among men was ascribed exclusively to the people--the ends of government were declared to be to secure the natural rights of man; and that when the government degenerates from the promotion to the destruction of that end, the right and the duty accrues to the people to dissolve this degenerate government and to institute another.
A strong sense of the value and blessings of union induced the people, at a very early period, to institute a federal government to preserve and perpetuate it.
That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.
Wadley sent a message: `The President of the Zoological Institute presents his compliments to Professor Challenger, and would take it as a personal favor if he would do them the honor to come to their next meeting.
Ah, if I had only known then that he was only a common mortal, and that his mission had nothing more overpowering about it than the collecting of seeds and uncommon yams and extraordinary cabbages and peculiar bullfrogs for that poor, useless, innocent, mildewed old fossil the Smithsonian Institute, I would have felt so much relieved.

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