instress


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instress

(ˈɪnˌstrɛs)
vb (tr)
to create or sustain an inscape
n
the energy that sustains an inscape
References in periodicals archive ?
Hopkins's] synaesthetic sensibility shows up particularly in his defense of William Barnes's poetry on the basis of their "West-country instress.
Hence, rather than copying subjects, the iconographer should rely on the inspiration of the Spirit to unearth these spiritual qualities--similar to what Gerard Manley Hopkins in another context called the instress of a thing.
It seems that ability in stem reserve accumulation and remobilization can be considered as an appropriate trait instress condition during grain filling to develop wheat more adapted to harsh environments as well.
Indeed, Cahill (1984:233) writes of "the range and intricacy of his concerns, and of the control required to hold the different aspects of his personality in balance", a view suggesting a sort of psychological instress.
Valerie Delahaye, deputy general manager, Institut Rosell-Lallemand, Montreal, Canada, highlighted the potential role of probiotics instress management.
Las tesis de Scoto sobre la forma particular (el ser-esto) como punto de partida de todo conocimiento y perfeccion final de todo lo creado se acordaban muy bien con sus concepciones del inscape y del instress.
The trope of distress in Longfellow undergoes a sea change into Hopkins's concept of instress.
5) In moments that amount to cognitive and spiritual ignition, Hopkins puts forward, in minutely noticed phenomena, the thought "that all things are upheld by instress.
Digterskap het waarskynlik veel te make met instress waarvan Hopkins praat, waar die instress die krag of poetiese vermoe is waaruit die digter put om die inscape en die oppervlakte van die gedig te genereer.
Confirming Duncan specifically, Denise Levertov wrote of "the poetry of linguistic impulse," describing how "the absorption in language itself, the awareness of the world of multiple meaning revealed in sound, word, syntax, and the entering into this world in the poem, is as much an experience of constellation of perceptions as the instress of nonverbal sensuous and psychic events.
does so by fully exploring two terms made famous by Hopkins, inscape and instress, showing how they evolved from their origins in the esthetics of John Ruskin into the full-scale theological reading of creation Hopkins arrived at during his formation as a Jesuit.
Raiger goes on to show Hopkins's familiarity with STC's poetry and published prose and the influence he may have exerted on Hopkins's undergraduate essays, especially the ones written for Walter Pater, and on such burgeoning theories as inscape and instress.