instructress


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in•struc•tress

(ɪnˈstrʌk trɪs)
n.
a woman who instructs; teacher.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.instructress - a woman instructor
instructor, teacher - a person whose occupation is teaching
Translations

instructress

[ɪnˈstrʌktrɪs] Ninstructora f
dance instructressprofesora f de baile

instructress

n (also Sport) → Lehrerin f; (US) → Dozentin f; (Mil) → Ausbilderin f
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References in classic literature ?
A school for little children had been often in her thoughts; and, at one time, she had begun a review of her early studies in the New England Primer, with a view to prepare herself for the office of instructress.
Flights of fancy gave place, in her mind, to a steady fireside glow, and I had already begun to perceive how, with the development of the conviction that--as time went on without a public accident-- our young things could, after all, look out for themselves, she addressed her greatest solicitude to the sad case presented by their instructress.
Topsy, with great gravity and adroitness, went through the exercise completely to Miss Ophelia's satisfaction; smoothing the sheets, patting out every wrinkle, and exhibiting, through the whole process, a gravity and seriousness with which her instructress was greatly edified.
The refreshing meal, the brilliant fire, the presence and kindness of her beloved instructress, or, perhaps, more than all these, something in her own unique mind, had roused her powers within her.
You, yourself, are responsible, Tars Tarkas," I replied, "in that you furnished me with an instructress of remarkable ability; I have to thank Sola for my learning.
We will endeavour to do our duty by her, and she will, at least, have the advantage of companions of her own age, and of a regular instructress.
Would you deign to be my instructress, I should prove an apter scholar than if taught by Signor Rappaccini himself.
Her husband was a retired tradesman, who had realized a very comfortable fortune; but could not be prevailed upon to give a greater salary than twenty-five pounds to the instructress of his children.
When my friend, Lady Fuddleston, mentioned that her dear girls required an instructress (I am too poor to engage a governess for mine, but was I not educated at Chiswick?
If she could see the face of her fair instructress, she would not love her less, I am sure.
I was to be a governess; I became a governess; and went into the family of a poor nobleman, where there were two daughters--little children, but the parents wished them to grow up, if possible, under one instructress.
The opinion was not the result of hasty consideration, for which indeed there was no opportunity at that time, as the child came directly, and soon occupied herself in preparations for giving Kit a writing lesson, of which it seemed he had a couple every week, and one regularly on that evening, to the great mirth and enjoyment both of himself and his instructress.