insubordination


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in·sub·or·di·nate

 (ĭn′sə-bôr′dn-ĭt)
adj.
Not submissive to authority: has a history of insubordinate behavior.

in′sub·or′di·nate n.
in′sub·or′di·nate·ly adv.
in′sub·or′di·na′tion n.
Synonyms: insubordinate, rebellious, mutinous, factious, seditious
These adjectives mean engaged in or promoting the defiance of established authority. Insubordinate implies failure or refusal to submit to the authority of a superior: was fired for being insubordinate.
Rebellious implies open defiance of authority or resistance to control: rebellious students demonstrating on campus.
Mutinous pertains to revolt against constituted authority, especially that of a naval or military command: mutinous sailors defying the captain.
Factious implies unruly dissension within a group or organization: "The army has been embroiled in a standoff battle against a [hornets'] nest of factious groups" (Time).
Seditious applies mainly to the treasonous stirring up of resistance against a government: rebels distributing seditious pamphlets.

in•sub•or•di•na•tion

(ˌɪn səˌbɔr dnˈeɪ ʃən)
n.
disobedience to authority.
[1785–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.insubordination - defiance of authority
defiance, rebelliousness - intentionally contemptuous behavior or attitude
subordination - the quality of obedient submissiveness
2.insubordination - an insubordinate act
resistance - group action in opposition to those in power
contumacy - obstinate rebelliousness and insubordination; resistance to authority
disobedience, noncompliance - the failure to obey

insubordination

insubordination

noun
The condition or practice of not obeying:
Translations
عِصْيان، تَمَرُّد، عَدَم خُضوع
nekázeň
ulydighed
fegyelemsértés
óhlÿîni
asilikisyankârlıkitaatsizlik

insubordination

[ˈɪnsəˌbɔːdɪˈneɪʃən] Ninsubordinación f

insubordination

[ˌɪnsəbɔːrdɪˈneɪʃən] ninsubordination f

insubordination

nAufsässigkeit f; (Mil) → Gehorsamsverweigerung f, → Insubordination f (dated)

insubordination

[ˈɪnsəˌbɔːdɪˈneɪʃn] ninsubordinazione f

insubordinate

(insəˈboːdənət) adjective
(of a person or his behaviour) disobedient or rebellious. an insubordinate employee.
ˈinsuˌbordiˈnation (-boː-) noun
References in classic literature ?
When the common soldiers are too strong and their officers too weak, the result is insubordination.
It ain't good for her, and the surgeon don't like it, and tried to persuade her not to and couldn't; and when he ORDERED her, she was that outraged and indignant, and was very severe on him, and accused him of insubordination, and said it didn't become him to give orders to an officer of her rank.
As night approached, it proving impossible to quell her insubordination by rebuke or threats of punishment, Master Brackett, the jailer, thought fit to introduce a physician.
The adjutant told them that the affair was likely to take a very bad turn: that a court-martial had been appointed, and that in view of the severity with which marauding and insubordination were now regarded, degradation to the ranks would be the best that could be hoped for.
Nibs exclaimed, aghast at such insubordination, whereupon Peter went sternly toward the young lady's chamber.
Thus, though he had paid the highest wages, he joined the Mine-owners' Association, engineered the fight, and effectually curbed the growing insubordination of the wage-earners.
Pardon me, my dear," he said with affected solemnity, "for mentioning these disagreeable particulars, the natural though regrettable incidents of a conjugal quarrel-- resulting, doubtless, from the luckless wife's insubordination.
And, then, other reasons make me act mildly towards you; in the first place, because you are a man of sense, a man of excellent sense, a man of heart, and that you will be a capital servant to him who shall have mastered you; secondly, because you will cease to have any motives for insubordination.
But however angry the Arabs might have been at the insubordination of their slaves, they were at least convinced that it would be the better part of wisdom to forego the pleasure of firing the village that had given them two such nasty receptions.
As a matter of fact, Snider, it seemed to me, was taking advantage of every opportunity, however slight, to show insubordination, and I determined then that at the first real breach of discipline I should take action that would remind Snider, ever after, that I was still his commanding officer.
Well, well, Miss Sedley was exceedingly alarmed at this act of insubordination.
The spirit of insubordination, which emanated from the unfortunate Asa, had spread among his juniors; and the squatter had been made painfully to remember the time when, in the wantonness of his youth and vigour, he had, reversing the order of the brutes, cast off his own aged and failing parents, to enter into the world unshackled and free.