insularity


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in·su·lar

 (ĭn′sə-lər, ĭns′yə-)
adj.
1.
a. Of, relating to, or constituting an island.
b. Living or located on an island.
2.
a. Suggestive of the isolated life of an island: "He is an exceedingly insular man, so deeply private as to seem inaccessible to the scrutiny of a novelist" (Leonard Michaels).
b. Circumscribed and detached in outlook and experience; narrow or provincial.
3. Anatomy Of or relating to isolated tissue or an island of tissue.

[French insulaire, from Late Latin īnsulāris, from Latin īnsula, island.]

in′su·lar·ism, in′su·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.
in′su·lar·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.insularity - the state of being isolated or detached; "the insulation of England was preserved by the English Channel"
isolation - a state of separation between persons or groups
Translations

insularity

[ˌɪnsjʊˈlærɪtɪ] Ninsularidad f (fig) → estrechez f de miras

insularity

[ˌɪnsjʊˈlærɪti] n (= narrow-mindedness) [person, community] → esprit m de clocher
They have started to break out of their old insularity → Ils ont commencé à se départir de leur vieil esprit de clocher.

insularity

n (= narrow-mindedness)Engstirnigkeit f
References in classic literature ?
Hers was that common insularity of mind that makes human creatures believe that their color, creed, and politics are best and right and that other human creatures scattered over the world are less fortunately placed than they.
His point of view is unusually broad, his chief general purpose being to free English taste from its insularity, to give it sympathetic acquaintance with the peculiar excellences of other literatures.
Yet here too Patton prefers to stress the implications of prolonged human/animal co-survivals before extinction by indirect anthropogenic effects (agricultural land degradation) for the biogeographic model's weakness for understanding human insularity.
The self-defeating isolation and insularity so pervasive in black political thought these days makes an easy target.
Diversity among employment sectors and industries has afforded Norwalk considerable insularity from regional economic downturns.
Like most Reds, I am desperate for him to succeed but just hope that, like Houllier, his obstinacy doesn't lead to insularity and conceit.
Here he collects 21 essays and articles pivoting on resistance to insularity, taking his own field as a case study for professional discourse in general.
One of the great advantages of this new novel from Joanne Harris, who gave us Chocolat not so very long ago, is the way she conveys the isolation and insularity of her island characters.
The issue of police reform is not well-served by the insularity of our discussions.
there is a diligent insularity about their second album which leads one to wonder if they've been actually institutionalised.
A "radical scholar" and former punk musician and 'zine editor who claims to be "of the world [he] writes," Stephen Duncombe brings neo-Marxism to bear on the thorny issues of purity versus sellout, withdrawal versus action, and accessibility versus insularity.