insulted


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Related to insulted: insultingly, flouts

in·sult

 (ĭn-sŭlt′)
v. in·sult·ed, in·sult·ing, in·sults
v.tr.
1.
a. To treat with gross insensitivity, insolence, or contemptuous rudeness. See Synonyms at offend.
b. To affront or demean: an absurd speech that insulted the intelligence of the audience.
2. Obsolete To make an attack on.
v.intr. Archaic
To behave arrogantly.
n. (ĭn′sŭlt′)
1. An insulting remark or act.
2.
a. Medicine A bodily injury, irritation, or trauma.
b. Something that causes injury, irritation, or trauma: "the middle of the Bronx, buffeted and poisoned by the worst environmental insults that urban America can dish out" (William K. Stevens).

[French insulter, from Old French, to assault, from Latin īnsultāre, to leap at, insult, frequentative of īnsilīre, to leap upon : in-, on; see in-2 + salīre, to leap; see sel- in Indo-European roots.]

in·sult′er n.
in·sult′ing·ly adv.

insulted

(ɪnˈsʌltɪd)
adj
offended
Translations
užaljen

insulted

[ɪnˈsʌltɪd] adjinsulté(e)
References in classic literature ?
Meg bathed the insulted hand with glycerine and tears, Beth felt that even her beloved kittens would fail as a balm for griefs like this, Jo wrathfully proposed that Mr.
Except for that small expenditure in the decoration of her infant, Hester bestowed all her superfluous means in charity, on wretches less miserable than herself, and who not unfrequently insulted the hand that fed them.
My lady put up her scornful lip and withdrew to one side; she said in their hearing that she would as soon think of eating with the other cattle -- a remark which embarrassed these poor devils merely be- cause it referred to them, and not because it insulted or offended them, for it didn't.
But glowing with rage, the King commanded to seize the criminal and lead him to death, who had ventured to dance, with the queen; so disgraced the Empress, and insulted the crown.
She thought nothing of his attachment, and was insulted by his hopes.
Ferrars DID come to see them, and always treated them with the make-believe of decent affection, they were never insulted by her real favour and preference.
Neither of them possessed energy or wit to belabour me soundly, but they insulted me as coarsely as they could in their little way: especially Celine, who even waxed rather brilliant on my personal defects--deformities she termed them.
The insulted visitor moved to the spot where he had laid his hat, pale and with a quivering lip.
His anger and insulted pride made him forget everything but this one moment and filled him with a power he had never known before, an almost unnatural strength.
Larkins, who asks me how my schoolfellows are, which he needn't do, as I have not come there to be insulted.
thou remindest me, too, that I have a debt to pay to that insolent peasant who yesterday insulted our person.
I will not stay here to be insulted," said Hetty, her distress returning.