insurgent

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in·sur·gent

 (ĭn-sûr′jənt)
adj.
1. Rising in revolt against a government or other established authority.
2. Rebelling against the leadership of a political party.
n.
One who is insurgent.

[Latin īnsurgēns, īnsurgent-, present participle of īnsurgere, to rise up : in-, intensive pref.; see in-2 + surgere, to rise; see surge.]

in·sur′gent·ly adv.

insurgent

(ɪnˈsɜːdʒənt)
adj
rebellious or in revolt, as against a government in power or the civil authorities
n
1. a person who takes part in an uprising or rebellion; insurrectionist
2. (Law) international law a person or group that rises in revolt against an established government or authority but whose conduct does not amount to belligerency
[C18: from Latin insurgēns rising upon or against, from insurgere to rise up, from surgere to rise]
inˈsurgency n

in•sur•gent

(ɪnˈsɜr dʒənt)

n.
1. a person who takes part in forcible opposition or armed resistance to an established government or authority; rebel.
2. a member of a group, esp. a political party, who revolts against the policies of the leadership.
adj.
3. rising in revolt; rebellious.
[1755–65; < Latin insurgere to get up, ascend, rebel]

insurgent

Member of a political party who rebels against established leadership. See also antiterrorism; counterinsurgency; insurgency.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.insurgent - a person who takes part in an armed rebellion against the constituted authority (especially in the hope of improving conditions)insurgent - a person who takes part in an armed rebellion against the constituted authority (especially in the hope of improving conditions)
mutineer - someone who is openly rebellious and refuses to obey authorities (especially seamen or soldiers)
crusader, meliorist, reformer, reformist, social reformer - a disputant who advocates reform
revolutionary, revolutionist, subversive, subverter - a radical supporter of political or social revolution
Young Turk - a member of one or more of the insurgent groups in Turkey in the late 19th century who rebelled against the absolutism of Ottoman rule
2.insurgent - a member of an irregular armed force that fights a stronger force by sabotage and harassmentinsurgent - a member of an irregular armed force that fights a stronger force by sabotage and harassment
guerilla force, guerrilla force - an irregular armed force that fights by sabotage and harassment; often rural and organized in large groups
Maquis, Maquisard - a guerrilla fighter in the French underground in World War II
urban guerrilla - a guerrilla who fights only in cities and towns
warrior - someone engaged in or experienced in warfare
Adj.1.insurgent - in opposition to a civil authority or government
disloyal - deserting your allegiance or duty to leader or cause or principle; "disloyal aides revealed his indiscretions to the papers"

insurgent

noun
1. rebel, revolutionary, revolter, rioter, resister, mutineer, revolutionist, insurrectionist The insurgents took control of the main military air base.
adjective
1. rebellious, revolutionary, mutinous, revolting, riotous, seditious, disobedient, insubordinate, insurrectionary The insurgent leaders were publicly executed.

insurgent

adjective
Participating in open revolt against a government or ruling authority:
noun
Translations
rebelrebelantský
oprører
uppreisnar-uppreisnarmaîur
maištaujantissukilėlissukilęs
dumpīgsdumpinieksnemiernieks
rebelantský

insurgent

[ɪnˈsɜːdʒənt]
A. Ninsurgente mf, insurrecto/a m/f

insurgent

[ɪnˈsɜːrənt]
adjinsurgé(e)
ninsurgé(e) m/f

insurgent

nAufständische(r) mf

insurgent

[ɪnˈsɜːdʒənt]
1. adjribelle
2. ninsorto/a, rivoltoso/a

insurgent

(inˈsəːdʒənt) adjective
rising up in rebellion. an insurgent population.
noun
a rebel. the leading insurgents.
References in classic literature ?
Fearing in his heart lest this might prove but too true, the captain a little desisted, but still commanded the insurgents instantly to return to their duty.
To strengthen, perpetuate, and extend this interest was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union, even by war; while the government claimed no right to do more than to restrict the territorial enlargement of it.
But how the insurgents had fared since that time I was absolutely ignorant, and it was not Captain Nemo, deprived of all land communications, who could tell me.
besides, if they do, we can easily make an excuse; we came straight off a journey and are insurgents, too.
This affair was called Shays's war, because a Captain Shays was the chief leader of the insurgents.
George's Fields, the Bank attacked, the Tower threatened, the streets of London flowing with blood, a detachment of the Twelfth Light Dragoons (the hopes of the nation) called up from Northampton to quell the insurgents, and the gallant Captain Frederick Tilney, in the moment of charging at the head of his troop, knocked off his horse by a brickbat from an upper window.
They showed us likewise the bloody robe which that archbishop of Paris wore who exposed his sacred person and braved the wrath of the insurgents of 1848, to mount the barricades and hold aloft the olive branch of peace in the hope of stopping the slaughter.
The attention of the insurgents had been drawn away from murder to plunder, and all over the castle might be heard their cries and whoops of delight as they dragged forth the rich tapestries, the silver flagons, and the carved furniture.
In the first rank of the insurgents, Barnaby and Hugh stood side by side.
TO THE HONORABLE THE COMMANDER OF THE INSURGENT CHIVALRY OF ENGLAND: YOU fight in vain.
Even in our own days, when morals are better understood, an execution, a bruising match, a riot, or a meeting of radical reformers, collects, at considerable hazard to themselves, immense crowds of spectators, otherwise little interested, except to see how matters are to be conducted, or whether the heroes of the day are, in the heroic language of insurgent tailors, flints or dunghills.
And this again, that that insurgent horror was knit to him closer than a wife, closer than an eye; lay caged in his flesh, where he heard it mutter and felt it struggle to be born; and at every hour of weakness, and in the confidence of slumber, prevailed against him, and deposed him out of life.