intangible

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in·tan·gi·ble

 (ĭn-tăn′jə-bəl)
adj.
1. Incapable of being perceived by the senses.
2. Incapable of being realized or defined.
3. Incorporeal.
n.
1. Something intangible: The athlete owed his success not only to strength and speed but also to intangibles such as perseverance and dedication.
2. often intangibles
a. An asset that cannot be perceived by the senses, such as intellectual property or goodwill.
b. Law Incorporeal property such as bank deposits, stocks, bonds, and promissory notes: a state tax on intangibles.

in·tan′gi·bil′i·ty, in·tan′gi·ble·ness n.
in·tan′gi·bly adv.

intangible

(ɪnˈtændʒɪbəl)
adj
1. incapable of being perceived by touch; impalpable
2. imprecise or unclear to the mind: intangible ideas.
3. (Accounting & Book-keeping) (of property or a business asset) saleable though not possessing intrinsic productive value
n
something that is intangible
inˌtangiˈbility, inˈtangibleness n
inˈtangibly adv

in•tan•gi•ble

(ɪnˈtæn dʒə bəl)

adj.
1. not tangible; impalpable.
2. not definite or clear to the mind; vague; elusive.
n.
3. something intangible, esp. an intangible asset, as goodwill.
[1630–40; < Medieval Latin]
in•tan`gi•bil′i•ty, in•tan′gi•ble•ness, n.
in•tan′gi•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intangible - assets that are saleable though not material or physical
assets - anything of material value or usefulness that is owned by a person or company
goodwill, good will - (accounting) an intangible asset valued according to the advantage or reputation a business has acquired (over and above its tangible assets)
Adj.1.intangible - (of especially business assets) not having physical substance or intrinsic productive value; "intangible assets such as good will"
business enterprise, commercial enterprise, business - the activity of providing goods and services involving financial and commercial and industrial aspects; "computers are now widely used in business"
tangible - (of especially business assets) having physical substance and intrinsic monetary value ; "tangible property like real estate"; "tangible assets such as machinery"
2.intangible - incapable of being perceived by the senses especially the sense of touch; "the intangible constituent of energy"- James Jeans
abstract - existing only in the mind; separated from embodiment; "abstract words like `truth' and `justice'"
tangible, touchable - perceptible by the senses especially the sense of touch; "skin with a tangible roughness"
3.intangible - hard to pin down or identify; "an intangible feeling of impending disaster"
unidentifiable - impossible to identify
4.intangible - lacking substance or reality; incapable of being touched or seen; "that intangible thing--the soul"
nonmaterial, immaterial - not consisting of matter; "immaterial apparitions"; "ghosts and other immaterial entities"

intangible

adjective abstract, vague, invisible, dim, elusive, shadowy, airy, unreal, indefinite, ethereal, evanescent, incorporeal, impalpable, unsubstantial the intangible dimensions of our existence

intangible

adjective
Translations

intangible

[ɪnˈtændʒəbl]
A. ADJ (gen) → intangible
B. CPD intangible assets NPLactivo msing intangible

intangible

[ɪnˈtændʒɪbəl]
adj
[quality, factor, aspect] → intangible
(FINANCE) [assets] → immatériel(le) intangibles
nplintangibles mpl

intangible

adj
fears, longingsunbestimmbar
(Jur, Comm) intangible propertyimmaterielle Güter pl; intangible capitalimmaterielles Kapital

intangible

[ɪnˈtændʒəbl] adj
a. (fears, hopes) → indefinibile
b. (Comm) (asset) → immateriale
References in periodicals archive ?
It too was intangibly exploring the fictional farm where cats and dogs got along and where pigs were encouraged to go feral.
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