intellect


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in·tel·lect

 (ĭn′tl-ĕkt′)
n.
1.
a. The ability to learn and reason; the capacity for knowledge and understanding: "Opinion is ultimately determined by the feelings, and not by the intellect" (Herbert Spencer).
b. A person's individual ability to think and reason: "[His] humanitarianism could never overcome the rigidities of his intellect or the shortcomings of his temperament" (Michael B. Stoff).
2. A person of great intellectual ability: "Gifted as both an athlete and an intellect, [he] received help from teachers who recognized his talents" (Anita Silvey).

[Middle English, from Old French intellecte, from Latin intellēctus, perception, from past participle of intellegere, to perceive; see intelligent.]

intellect

(ˈɪntɪˌlɛkt)
n
1. (Psychology) the capacity for understanding, thinking, and reasoning, as distinct from feeling or wishing
2. a mind or intelligence, esp a brilliant one: his intellect is wasted on that job.
3. informal a person possessing a brilliant mind; brain
4. those possessing the greatest mental power: the intellect of a nation.
[C14: from Latin intellectus comprehension, intellect, from intellegere to understand; see intelligence]
ˌintelˈlective adj
ˌintelˈlectively adv

in•tel•lect

(ˈɪn tlˌɛkt)

n.
1. the faculty of the mind by which one knows or understands, as distinguished from that by which one feels or wills; capacity for thinking and acquiring knowledge.
2. capacity for thinking and acquiring knowledge of a high or complex order.
3. a particular mind or intelligence, esp. of a high order.
4. a person possessing a great capacity for thought and knowledge.
5. minds collectively.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin intellēctus percerption, n. use of past participle of intelleg(ere) to understand; see intelligent]
in`tel•lec′tive, adj.
in`tel•lec′tive•ly, adv.
syn: See mind.

intellect

  • heart - As the seat of feeling and intellect, heart has been used since around 825.
  • intellect, intelligent - Intellect and intelligent come from Latin intelligere, "perceive" or "understand."
  • intelligible - Means "understandable through the intellect."
  • inwit - Usually means "an inner sense of right or wrong," but its more general meaning is "reason, intellect, understanding, or wisdom."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intellect - knowledge and intellectual abilityintellect - knowledge and intellectual ability; "he reads to improve his mind"; "he has a keen intellect"
intelligence - the ability to comprehend; to understand and profit from experience
2.intellect - the capacity for rational thought or inference or discriminationintellect - the capacity for rational thought or inference or discrimination; "we are told that man is endowed with reason and capable of distinguishing good from evil"
faculty, mental faculty, module - one of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mind
3.intellect - a person who uses the mind creativelyintellect - a person who uses the mind creatively
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
anomalist - someone who has a special interest in exceptional cases
exponent - someone who expounds and interprets or explains
alchemist - one who was versed in the practice of alchemy and who sought an elixir of life and a panacea and an alkahest and the philosopher's stone
aphorist - someone who formulates aphorisms or who repeats aphorisms
bel esprit - a witty or clever person with a fine mind
clever clogs, clever Dick - an intellectual who is ostentatiously and irritatingly knowledgeable
decipherer, decoder - the kind of intellectual who converts messages from a code to plain text
egghead - an intellectual; a very studious and academic person; "in spite of her love of reading she denied being an egghead"
expositor, expounder - a person who explains
brainiac, genius, mastermind, Einstein, brain - someone who has exceptional intellectual ability and originality; "Mozart was a child genius"; "he's smart but he's no Einstein"
highbrow - a person of intellectual or erudite tastes
mentor, wise man - a wise and trusted guide and advisor
bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student - a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines
doubter, sceptic, skeptic - someone who habitually doubts accepted beliefs
specifier - someone who draws up specifications giving details (as for obtaining a patent)
subjectivist - a person who subscribes to subjectivism
synthesiser, synthesist, synthesizer - an intellectual who synthesizes or uses synthetic methods
idealogue, theoretician, theoriser, theorist, theorizer - someone who theorizes (especially in science or art)
creative thinker, thinker, mind - an important intellectual; "the great minds of the 17th century"
thinker - someone who exercises the mind (usually in an effort to reach a decision)
illusionist, seer, visionary - a person with unusual powers of foresight
wonderer - someone who is curious about something

intellect

noun
1. intelligence, mind, reason, understanding, sense, brains (informal), judgment Do the emotions develop in parallel with the intellect?
2. (Informal) thinker, intellectual, genius, mind, brain (informal), intelligence, rocket scientist (informal, chiefly U.S.), egghead (informal) My boss isn't a great intellect.
Quotations
"We should take care not to make the intellect our god; it has, of course, powerful muscles, but no personality" [Albert Einstein Out of My Later Years]

intellect

noun
1. The faculty of thinking, reasoning, and acquiring and applying knowledge:
Slang: smart (used in plural).
2. A person of great mental ability:
Translations
عَقْل، فِكْر، القُوَّه العَقْلِيَّه
intelekt
intellekt
ajattelijaälyälykköjärki
vitsmunir; gáfur
intelektasintelektualinisprotinis
intelektsprāts
intelekt
razum

intellect

[ˈɪntɪlekt] N
1. (= reasoning power) → intelecto m, inteligencia f
2. (= person) → cerebro m

intellect

[ˈɪntɪlɛkt] n
(= thinking powers) → intellect m
(= cleverness) → intellect m, intelligence f
a woman of keen intellect → une femme d'une vive intelligence

intellect

n
Intellekt m; a man of keen intellectein Mensch mmit einem scharfen Intellekt; his powers of intellectseine intellektuellen Fähigkeiten
(= person)großer Geist

intellect

[ˈɪntɪlɛkt] nintelletto

intellect

(ˈintilekt) noun
the thinking power of the mind. He was a person of great intellect.
ˌintelˈlectual (-ˈlektʃuəl) adjective
of, or appealing to, the intellect. He does not play football – his interests are mainly intellectual.
References in classic literature ?
Another and a better gift than intellect was shown her in a most unexpected manner.
An act of so much precipitancy and presumption would seal the downfall of precocious intellect forever.
It seemed a queer anomaly, that so gaunt and dismal a personage should take a toy in hand; a miracle, that the toy did not vanish in her grasp; a miserably absurd idea, that she should go on perplexing her stiff and sombre intellect with the question how to tempt little boys into her premises
Externally, the jollity of aged men has much in common with the mirth of children; the intellect, any more than a deep sense of humour, has little to do with the matter; it is, with both, a gleam that plays upon the surface, and imparts a sunny and cheery aspect alike to the green branch and grey, mouldering trunk.
For now, since by many prolonged, repeated experiences, I have perceived that in all cases man must eventually lower, or at least shift, his conceit of attainable felicity; not placing it anywhere in the intellect or the fancy; but in the wife, the heart, the bed, the table, the saddle, the fire-side, the country; now that I have perceived all this, I am ready to squeeze case eternally.
The American has dwindled into an Odd Fellow--one who may be known by the development of his organ of gregariousness, and a manifest lack of intellect and cheerful self-reliance; whose first and chief concern, on coming into the world, is to see that the almshouses are in good repair; and, before yet he has lawfully donned the virile garb, to collect a fund to the support of the widows and orphans that may be; who, in short, ventures to live only by the aid of the Mutual Insurance company, which has promised to bury him decently.
I trust that we shall be more imaginative, that our thoughts will be clearer, fresher, and more ethereal, as our sky--our understanding more comprehensive and broader, like our plains--our intellect generally on a grander seale, like our thunder and lightning, our rivers and mountains and forests-and our hearts shall even correspond in breadth and depth and grandeur to our inland seas.
The brightest intellect in the land would not have been able to see that her position was defective.
It seems to me that in the matter of intellect the ant must be a strangely overrated bird.
There stood one, in physical proportion and stature commanding and exact--in intellect richly endowed--in natural elo- quence a prodigy--in soul manifestly "created but a little lower than the angels"--yet a slave, ay, a fugi- tive slave,--trembling for his safety, hardly daring to believe that on the American soil, a single white person could be found who would befriend him at all hazards, for the love of God and humanity
There are places in town, offices, where inquiry would soon produce somethingOffices for the sale not quite of human fleshbut of human intellect.
I remember it now, and I know that it was the effluence of fine intellect, of true courage; it lit up her marked lineaments, her thin face, her sunken grey eye, like a reflection from the aspect of an angel.