intellect

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in·tel·lect

 (ĭn′tl-ĕkt′)
n.
1.
a. The ability to learn and reason; the capacity for knowledge and understanding: "Opinion is ultimately determined by the feelings, and not by the intellect" (Herbert Spencer).
b. A person's individual ability to think and reason: "[His] humanitarianism could never overcome the rigidities of his intellect or the shortcomings of his temperament" (Michael B. Stoff).
2. A person of great intellectual ability: "Gifted as both an athlete and an intellect, [he] received help from teachers who recognized his talents" (Anita Silvey).

[Middle English, from Old French intellecte, from Latin intellēctus, perception, from past participle of intellegere, to perceive; see intelligent.]

intellect

(ˈɪntɪˌlɛkt)
n
1. (Psychology) the capacity for understanding, thinking, and reasoning, as distinct from feeling or wishing
2. a mind or intelligence, esp a brilliant one: his intellect is wasted on that job.
3. informal a person possessing a brilliant mind; brain
4. those possessing the greatest mental power: the intellect of a nation.
[C14: from Latin intellectus comprehension, intellect, from intellegere to understand; see intelligence]
ˌintelˈlective adj
ˌintelˈlectively adv

in•tel•lect

(ˈɪn tlˌɛkt)

n.
1. the faculty of the mind by which one knows or understands, as distinguished from that by which one feels or wills; capacity for thinking and acquiring knowledge.
2. capacity for thinking and acquiring knowledge of a high or complex order.
3. a particular mind or intelligence, esp. of a high order.
4. a person possessing a great capacity for thought and knowledge.
5. minds collectively.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin intellēctus percerption, n. use of past participle of intelleg(ere) to understand; see intelligent]
in`tel•lec′tive, adj.
in`tel•lec′tive•ly, adv.
syn: See mind.

intellect

  • heart - As the seat of feeling and intellect, heart has been used since around 825.
  • intellect, intelligent - Intellect and intelligent come from Latin intelligere, "perceive" or "understand."
  • intelligible - Means "understandable through the intellect."
  • inwit - Usually means "an inner sense of right or wrong," but its more general meaning is "reason, intellect, understanding, or wisdom."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intellect - knowledge and intellectual abilityintellect - knowledge and intellectual ability; "he reads to improve his mind"; "he has a keen intellect"
intelligence - the ability to comprehend; to understand and profit from experience
2.intellect - the capacity for rational thought or inference or discriminationintellect - the capacity for rational thought or inference or discrimination; "we are told that man is endowed with reason and capable of distinguishing good from evil"
faculty, mental faculty, module - one of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mind
3.intellect - a person who uses the mind creativelyintellect - a person who uses the mind creatively
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
anomalist - someone who has a special interest in exceptional cases
exponent - someone who expounds and interprets or explains
alchemist - one who was versed in the practice of alchemy and who sought an elixir of life and a panacea and an alkahest and the philosopher's stone
aphorist - someone who formulates aphorisms or who repeats aphorisms
bel esprit - a witty or clever person with a fine mind
clever clogs, clever Dick - an intellectual who is ostentatiously and irritatingly knowledgeable
decipherer, decoder - the kind of intellectual who converts messages from a code to plain text
egghead - an intellectual; a very studious and academic person; "in spite of her love of reading she denied being an egghead"
expositor, expounder - a person who explains
brainiac, genius, mastermind, Einstein, brain - someone who has exceptional intellectual ability and originality; "Mozart was a child genius"; "he's smart but he's no Einstein"
highbrow - a person of intellectual or erudite tastes
mentor, wise man - a wise and trusted guide and advisor
bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student - a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines
doubter, sceptic, skeptic - someone who habitually doubts accepted beliefs
specifier - someone who draws up specifications giving details (as for obtaining a patent)
subjectivist - a person who subscribes to subjectivism
synthesiser, synthesist, synthesizer - an intellectual who synthesizes or uses synthetic methods
idealogue, theoretician, theoriser, theorist, theorizer - someone who theorizes (especially in science or art)
creative thinker, thinker, mind - an important intellectual; "the great minds of the 17th century"
thinker - someone who exercises the mind (usually in an effort to reach a decision)
illusionist, seer, visionary - a person with unusual powers of foresight
wonderer - someone who is curious about something

intellect

noun
1. intelligence, mind, reason, understanding, sense, brains (informal), judgment Do the emotions develop in parallel with the intellect?
2. (Informal) thinker, intellectual, genius, mind, brain (informal), intelligence, rocket scientist (informal, chiefly U.S.), egghead (informal) My boss isn't a great intellect.
Quotations
"We should take care not to make the intellect our god; it has, of course, powerful muscles, but no personality" [Albert Einstein Out of My Later Years]

intellect

noun
1. The faculty of thinking, reasoning, and acquiring and applying knowledge:
Slang: smart (used in plural).
2. A person of great mental ability:
Translations
عَقْل، فِكْر، القُوَّه العَقْلِيَّه
intelekt
intellekt
ajattelijaälyälykköjärki
vitsmunir; gáfur
intelektasintelektualinisprotinis
intelektsprāts
intelekt
razum

intellect

[ˈɪntɪlekt] N
1. (= reasoning power) → intelecto m, inteligencia f
2. (= person) → cerebro m

intellect

[ˈɪntɪlɛkt] n
(= thinking powers) → intellect m
(= cleverness) → intellect m, intelligence f
a woman of keen intellect → une femme d'une vive intelligence

intellect

n
Intellekt m; a man of keen intellectein Mensch mmit einem scharfen Intellekt; his powers of intellectseine intellektuellen Fähigkeiten
(= person)großer Geist

intellect

[ˈɪntɪlɛkt] nintelletto

intellect

(ˈintilekt) noun
the thinking power of the mind. He was a person of great intellect.
ˌintelˈlectual (-ˈlektʃuəl) adjective
of, or appealing to, the intellect. He does not play football – his interests are mainly intellectual.
References in classic literature ?
It appeared from the unembellished statement of David, that his own presence had been rather endured than desired; though even Magua had not been entirely exempt from that veneration with which the Indians regard those whom the Great Spirit had visited in their intellects.
But while hapless Dough-Boy was by nature dull and torpid in his intellects, Pip, though over tender-hearted, was at bottom very bright, with that pleasant, genial, jolly brightness peculiar to his tribe; a tribe, which ever enjoy all holidays and festivities with finer, freer relish than any other race.
Our intellects are a good deal sharpened up, here, in some ways, and that is one of them.
And everybody crowded back to Uncle Silas's little old church, and was ever so loving and kind to him and the family and couldn't do enough for them; and Uncle Silas he preached them the blamedest jumbledest idiotic sermons you ever struck, and would tangle you up so you couldn't find your way home in daylight; but the people never let on but what they thought it was the clearest and brightest and elegantest sermons that ever was; and they would set there and cry, for love and pity; but, by George, they give me the jim-jams and the fan-tods and caked up what brains I had, and turned them solid; but by and by they loved the old man's intellects back into him again, and he was as sound in his skull as ever he was, which ain't no flattery, I reckon.
Nothing has been left undone to cripple their intellects, darken their minds, debase their moral nature, obliterate all traces of their relation- ship to mankind; and yet how wonderfully they have sustained the mighty load of a most frightful bond- age, under which they have been groaning for cen- turies
It was by no means his daughter's wish that the intellects of Highbury in general should be put under requisition.
Look where you will, in every high place there sits an Ass, settled beyond the reach of all the greatest intellects in this world to pull him down.
I have reason to think that Joe's intellects were brightened by the encounter they had passed through, and that on our way to Pumblechook's he invented a subtle and deep design.
Their houses are very ill built, the walls bevil, without one right angle in any apartment; and this defect arises from the contempt they bear to practical geometry, which they despise as vulgar and mechanic; those instructions they give being too refined for the intellects of their workmen, which occasions perpetual mistakes.
I choose my friends for their good looks, my acquaintances for their good characters, and my enemies for their good intellects.
Infamous beings, who by your vile grovelling intellects deserve that heaven should not make known to you the virtue that lies in knight-errantry, or show you the sin and ignorance in which ye lie when ye refuse to respect the shadow, not to say the presence, of any knight-errant
Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us.