intelligent


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in·tel·li·gent

 (ĭn-tĕl′ə-jənt)
adj.
1. Having intelligence: Is there intelligent life elsewhere in the galaxy?
2. Having a high degree of intelligence; mentally acute: an intelligent student.
3. Showing sound judgment and rationality: an intelligent decision; an intelligent solution to the problem.
4. Appealing to the intellect; intellectual: a film with witty and intelligent dialogue.

[Latin intelligēns, intelligent-, present participle of intellegere, intelligere, to perceive : inter-, inter- + legere, to choose; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

in·tel′li·gen′tial (-jĕn′shəl) adj.
in·tel′li·gent·ly adv.
Synonyms: intelligent, bright, brilliant, smart, intellectual
These adjectives mean having or showing mental keenness. Intelligent usually implies the ability to cope with new problems and to use the power of reasoning and inference effectively: The company put its most intelligent engineers to work on rectifying the design flaw. Bright implies quickness or ease in learning: She was a bright student who was soon at the head of the class. Brilliant suggests unusually impressive mental acuteness: "The dullard's envy of brilliant men is always assuaged by the suspicion that they will come to a bad end" (Max Beerbohm).
Smart refers to quick intelligence and often a ready capability for taking care of one's own interests: You were smart to buy your house when prices were low. Intellectual implies the capacity to grasp difficult or abstract concepts: The former professor was the more intellectual candidate.

intelligent

(ɪnˈtɛlɪdʒənt)
adj
1. having or indicating intelligence
2. having high intelligence; clever
3. indicating high intelligence; perceptive: an intelligent guess.
4. guided by reason; rational
5. (Computer Science) (of computerized functions) able to modify action in the light of ongoing events
6. archaic (foll by: of) having knowledge or information: they were intelligent of his whereabouts.
inˈtelligently adv

in•tel•li•gent

(ɪnˈtɛl ɪ dʒənt)

adj.
1. having good understanding or a high mental capacity; quick to comprehend.
2. displaying quickness of understanding, sound thought, or good judgment: an intelligent reply.
3. having the faculty of reasoning and understanding; possessing intelligence: intelligent beings on other planets.
4. (of an electronic device) containing built-in processing power; smart.
5. Archaic. having understanding or knowledge (usu. fol. by of).
[1500–10; < Latin intellegere=intel-, variant of inter- inter- + legere to choose]
in•tel`li•gen′tial (-ˈdʒɛn ʃəl) adj.
in•tel′li•gent•ly, adv.
syn: See sharp.
intellect, intelligent - Intellect and intelligent come from Latin intelligere, "perceive" or "understand."
See also related terms for intellect.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.intelligent - having the capacity for thought and reason especially to a high degree; "is there intelligent life in the universe?"; "an intelligent question"
smart - showing mental alertness and calculation and resourcefulness
precocious - characterized by or characteristic of exceptionally early development or maturity (especially in mental aptitude); "a precocious child"; "a precocious achievement"
unintelligent, stupid - lacking intelligence; "a dull job with lazy and unintelligent co-workers"
2.intelligent - possessing sound knowledge; "well-informed readers"
sophisticated - having or appealing to those having worldly knowledge and refinement and savoir-faire; "sophisticated young socialites"; "a sophisticated audience"; "a sophisticated lifestyle"; "a sophisticated book"
3.intelligent - exercising or showing good judgment; "healthy scepticism"; "a healthy fear of rattlesnakes"; "the healthy attitude of French laws"; "healthy relations between labor and management"; "an intelligent solution"; "a sound approach to the problem"; "sound advice"; "no sound explanation for his decision"
reasonable, sensible - showing reason or sound judgment; "a sensible choice"; "a sensible person"
4.intelligent - endowed with the capacity to reason
rational - consistent with or based on or using reason; "rational behavior"; "a process of rational inference"; "rational thought"

intelligent

adjective
2. smart (informal), automatic, automated, robotic, self-regulating An intelligent computer will soon be indispensable for every doctor.
3. rational, cognitive, capable of thought the search for intelligent life elsewhere in the universe

intelligent

adjective
1. Having or showing intelligence, often of a high order:
Informal: brainy.
2. Mentally quick and original:
3. Consistent with reason and intellect:
Translations
ذكيذَكيذَكِيٌّيَنِمُّ عن الذَّكاء
inteligentní
intelligentbegavet
älykäs
inteligentan
gáfulegur, skynsamlegurgreindur, gáfaîur
利口な
지적인
žiniosžvalgybažvalgybos pranešimai
apķērīgsgudrs
inteligentný
bisterinteligenten
intelligent
ฉลาด
thông minh

intelligent

[ɪnˈtelɪdʒənt] ADJinteligente

intelligent

[ɪnˈtɛlɪənt] adj
[person] → intelligent(e)
[remark, conversation] → intelligent(e)
[machine] → intelligent(e); [life, life-form] → intelligent(e)

intelligent

adjintelligent; are there intelligent beings on Mars?gibt es auf dem Mars vernunftbegabte or intelligente Lebewesen?

intelligent

[ɪnˈtɛlɪdʒnt] adjintelligente

intelligent

(inˈtelidʒənt) adjective
(negative unintelligent).
1. clever and quick at understanding. an intelligent child; That dog is so intelligent.
2. showing these qualities. an intelligent question.
inˈtelligently adverb
inˈtelligence noun
1. the quality of being intelligent. It requires a high degree of intelligence to do this job well.
2. news or information given.
3. a department of state or of the army etc which deals with secret information. He works in Intelligence.

intelligent

ذَكِيٌّ inteligentní intelligent intelligent ευφυής inteligente älykäs intelligent inteligentan intelligente 利口な 지적인 intelligent intelligent inteligentny inteligente умный intelligent ฉลาด zeki thông minh 聪明的

intelligent

a. inteligente, listo-a.

intelligent

adj inteligente
References in classic literature ?
His was an original brain, very intelligent but--without method.
For, after a long series of military successes, or diligent and skilful labours, it is generally found that the more intelligent among the Artisan and Soldier classes manifest a slight increase of their third side or base, and a shrinkage of the two other sides.
There had been a hasty consulta- tion, and since the Martians were evidently, in spite of their repulsive forms, intelligent creatures, it had been resolved to show them, by approaching them with signals, that we too were intelligent.
Oh, gentlemen, do you know, perhaps I consider myself an intelligent man, only because all my life I have been able neither to begin nor to finish anything.
All which evils, and many more that I say nothing of, would be removed if there were some intelligent and sensible person at the capital to examine all plays before they were acted, not only those produced in the capital itself, but all that were intended to be acted in Spain; without whose approval, seal, and signature, no local magistracy should allow any play to be acted.
What a sane man should be doing carrying about with him a woman's petticoat and silk stockings, may well be a puzzle to the most intelligent reader.
de Manicamp; a very intelligent young fellow, always poor, always needy, although he dipped his hand freely into the purse of M.
Every intelligent person present could see that the prisoner's chance of an honorable acquittal depended on tracing the poison to the possession of his wife--or at least on proving her expressed intention to obtain it.
That was because she would also be extremely intelligent, and, being extremely intelligent, would have need of kindness to enable her to bear with a not very intelligent man like himself.
The smallest boy I ever conversed with, carrying the largest baby I ever saw, offered a supernaturally intelligent explanation of the locality in its old uses, and was very nearly correct.
Certainly it was agreeable, when the day's work was over, to find one's employer an intelligent and cheerful companion; and if he was sometimes a little sarcastic and sometimes a little too insinuating, and if I did discover that his mildness was more a matter of appearance than of reality--if I did occasionally suspect the existence of flint or steel under an external covering of velvet--still we are none of us perfect; and weary as I was of the atmosphere of brutality and insolence in which I had constantly lived at X , I had no inclination now, on casting anchor in calmer regions, to institute at once a prying search after defects that were scrupulously withdrawn and carefully veiled from my view.
Saying these words, and with a profound bow, the musketeer, whose looks had lost none of their intelligent kindness, left the apartment.

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