intemperance


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in·tem·per·ance

 (ĭn-tĕm′pər-əns, -prəns)
n.
1. Lack of temperance, as in the indulgence of an appetite or a passion.
2. Excessive use of alcoholic beverages.

in•tem•per•ance

(ɪnˈtɛm pər əns, -prəns)

n.
1. immoderate indulgence in alcoholic beverages.
2. excessive indulgence of appetite or passion.
3. lack of moderation or restraint.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intemperance - the quality of being intemperate
unrestraint - the quality of lacking restraint
gluttony - habitual eating to excess
temperance, moderation - the trait of avoiding excesses
2.intemperance - consumption of alcoholic drinks
vice - a specific form of evildoing; "vice offends the moral standards of the community"
boozing, crapulence, drink, drinking, drunkenness - the act of drinking alcoholic beverages to excess; "drink was his downfall"
3.intemperance - excess in action and immoderate indulgence of bodily appetites, especially in passion or indulgence; "the intemperance of their language"
spree, fling - a brief indulgence of your impulses
dissipation, licentiousness, profligacy, dissolution, looseness - dissolute indulgence in sensual pleasure
jag - a bout of drinking or drug taking
humoring, indulging, pampering, indulgence - the act of indulging or gratifying a desire

intemperance

noun
Immoderate indulgence, as in food or drink:
Translations

intemperance

[ɪnˈtempərəns] N (= lack of self-restraint) → intemperancia f, inmoderación f; (= drunkenness) → exceso m en la bebida

intemperance

n (= lack of moderation)Maßlosigkeit f, → Unmäßigkeit f; (= drunkenness)Trunksucht f
References in classic literature ?
Or is the same control to be extended to other artists, and are they also to be prohibited from exhibiting the opposite forms of vice and intemperance and meanness and indecency in sculpture and building and the other creative arts; and is he who cannot conform to this rule of ours to be prevented from practising his art in our State, lest the taste of our citizens be corrupted by him?
Millward,' suggested he, when at length that gentleman paused in his discourse, 'that when a child may be naturally prone to intemperance - by the fault of its parents or ancestors, for instance - some precautions are advisable?
So saying, he took off his cup with much gravity, at the same time shaking his head at the intemperance of the Scottish harper.
To clear up which, I endeavoured to give some ideas of the desire of power and riches; of the terrible effects of lust, intemperance, malice, and envy.
Spots appeared on his nose, the redness of which was evidently due to intemperance, and his mouth twitched nervously.
When one reflects on the effect of intemperance on the aborigines of the two Americas, I think it will be acknowledged that every well-wisher of Tahiti owes no common debt of gratitude to the missionaries.
Few parts of the Constitution have been assailed with more intemperance than this; yet on a fair investigation of it, no part can appear more completely invulnerable.
But he said that the English idea that compulsory education would reduce bastardy and intemperance was an error--it has not that effect.
Murder, burglary, intemperance, or the minor vices you could have borne; but deceit you cannot abide.
Our friendship lasted, in this manner, for several years, during which my general temperament and character - through the instrumentality of the Fiend Intemperance - had (I blush to confess it) experienced a radical alteration for the worse.
Suddenly a corner was turned, a blaze of light burst upon our sight, and we stood before one of the huge suburban temples of Intemperance - one of the palaces of the fiend, Gin.
Raffles proved more unmanageable than he had shown himself to be in his former appearances, his chronic state of mental restlessness, the growing effect of habitual intemperance, quickly shaking off every impression from what was said to him.