intensely


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

in·tense

 (ĭn-tĕns′)
adj. in·tens·er, in·tens·est
1. Possessing or displaying a distinctive feature to an extreme degree: the intense sun of the tropics.
2. Extreme in degree, strength, or size: intense heat.
3. Involving or showing strain or extreme effort: intense concentration.
4.
a. Deeply felt; profound: intense anger.
b. Having or showing strong feeling or great seriousness: an intense writer.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin intēnsus, stretched, intent, from past participle of intendere, to stretch, intend; see intend.]

in·tense′ly adv.
in·tense′ness n.
Usage Note: The meanings of intense and intensive overlap considerably, but the two adjectives often have distinct meanings. Intense often suggests a strength or concentration that arises from an inner disposition and is particularly appropriate for describing emotional states: "He wondered vaguely why all this intense feeling went running because of a few burnt potatoes" (D.H. Lawrence). Intensive is more appropriate when the strength or concentration of an activity is imposed from without: "They worked out a system of intensive agriculture surpassing anything I ever heard of, with the very forests all reset with fruit- or nut-bearing trees" (Charlotte Perkins Gilman). Thus a reference to Mark's intense study of German suggests that Mark engaged in concentrated activity, while Mark's intensive study of German suggests the course Mark took was designed to cover a lot of material in a brief period.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.intensely - in an intense manner; "he worked intensely"

intensely

adverb
1. very, highly, extremely, greatly, strongly, severely, terribly, ultra, utterly, unusually, exceptionally, extraordinarily, markedly, awfully (informal), acutely, exceedingly, excessively, inordinately, uncommonly, to the nth degree, to or in the extreme The fast-food business is intensely competitive.
2. intently, deeply, seriously (informal), profoundly, passionately He sipped his drink, staring intensely at me.
Translations
جدا، بِشِدَّه
hluboce
intenst
ákaflega
zelo
şiddetle

intensely

[ɪnˈtenslɪ] ADV
1. (= extremely) [interesting, boring, competitive] → sumamente; [irritated] → sumamente, tremendamente; [grateful, moving] → profundamente, sumamente
difficulties of an intensely personal naturedificultades de carácter sumamente personal
to be intensely angryestar terriblemente enfadado or (LAm) enojado, estar enfadadísimo or (LAm) enojadísimo
2. (= concentratedly) [work, fight, concentrate] → intensamente
3. (= with passion) [look, love] → intensamente; [discuss] → apasionadamente; [say] → con pasión
I dislike it intenselyme desagrada profundamente
why do you dislike her so intensely?¿por qué te resulta tan antipática?
he was staring intensely at meme miraba fija e intensamente
they argued the point intenselylo discutieron acaloradamente

intensely

[ɪnˈtɛnsli] adv [irritating, annoying] → souverainement; [moving] → profondément; [personal, private] → des plus
The fast-food business is intensely competitive → Le secteur de la restauration rapide fait l'objet d'une concurrence intense.
A man's relationship to God is an intensely private affair → La relation d'un homme à Dieu est une affaire des plus privées.

intensely

adv
(= extremely) cold, hot, disappointed, irritated, difficultäußerst; intensely flavouredintensiv gewürzt; an intensely competitive businesseine Branche mit äußerst scharfer Konkurrenz; I dislike it intenselyich kann es absolut nicht ausstehen
(= with strong emotion, hard) feel, live, stare, work, studyintensiv; he spoke so intensely that none could doubt his sincerityer sprach mit einer solchen Intensität, dass niemand an seiner Aufrichtigkeit zweifeln konnte

intensely

[ɪnˈtɛnslɪ] adv (difficult, hot, cold) → estremamente; (moved) → profondamente

intense

(inˈtens) adjective
very great. intense heat; intense hatred.
inˈtensely adverb
very much. I dislike that sort of behaviour intensely.
inˈtenseness noun
inˈtensity noun
the quality of being intense. the intensity of the heat.
inˈtensive (-siv) adjective
very great; showing or having great care etc. The police began an intensive search for the murderer; The hospital has just opened a new intensive care unit.
inˈtensively adverb
inˈtensiveness noun
References in classic literature ?
The knight wished intensely that he could free them, but he was poor and could only go by each day, watching for the sweet face and longing to see it out in the sunshine.
One shudders at the thought of the meaninglessness of life while at the same in- stant, and if the people of the town are his people, one loves life so intensely that tears come into the eyes.
Then lowering the dangerous muzzle he stretched forward his long neck, as if to assist a scrutiny that was already intensely keen.
This strange act was perfectly understood by the group, who knew that in that intensely dry heat the danger of exposure was lessened by active exercise and the profuse perspiration that followed it.
the carpenter, beside his hearth, would say; or perhaps intensely will it, without a spoken word.
The eyes of the wrinkled scholar glowed so intensely upon her, that Hester Prynne clasped her hand over her heart, dreading lest he should read the secret there at once.
She looked intensely grave, and I had never had such a sense of losing an advantage acquired (the thrill of which had just been so prodigious) as on my consciousness that she addressed me with a reproach.
Nimbly springing up on the triangular raised box in the bow, the savage stood erect there, and with intensely eager eyes gazed off towards the spot where the chase had last been descried.
For a few minutes the struggle was intensely critical; for while they still slacked out the tightened line in one direction, and still plied their oars in another, the contending strain threatened to take them under.
All stood intensely silent, with their faces turned towards the expected messenger.
In New York these performances would have gathered a mighty crowd of curious and intensely interested spectators; but here it only captured an audience of half a dozen little boys who stood in a row across the pavement, some with their school-knapsacks on their backs and their hands in their pockets, others with arms full of bundles, and all absorbed in the show.
Each of these pretty homes had a garden in front fenced with white palings and opulently stocked with hollyhocks, marigolds, touch-me-nots, prince's-feathers, and other old-fashioned flowers; while on the windowsills of the houses stood wooden boxes containing moss rose plants and terra-cotta pots in which grew a breed of geranium whose spread of intensely red blossoms accented the prevailing pink tint of the rose-clad house-front like an explosion of flame.