interdict

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in·ter·dict

 (ĭn′tər-dĭkt′)
tr.v. in·ter·dict·ed, in·ter·dict·ing, in·ter·dicts
1. To prohibit (an action or thing) or forbid (someone) to do something, especially by legal or ecclesiastical order.
2.
a. To cut or destroy (a line of communication) by firepower so as to halt an enemy's advance.
b. To confront and halt the activities, advance, or entry of: "the role of the FBI in interdicting spies attempting to pass US secrets to the Soviet Union" (Christian Science Monitor).
n. (ĭn′tər-dĭkt′)
1. An authoritative prohibition, especially by court order.
2. Roman Catholic Church An ecclesiastical censure that bars an individual, members of a given group, or inhabitants of a given district from participation in most sacraments.

[Alteration of Middle English enterditen, to place under a church ban, from Old French entredit, past participle of entredire, to forbid, from Latin interdīcere, interdict- : inter-, inter- + dīcere, to say; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

in′ter·dic′tion n.
in′ter·dic′tive, in′ter·dic′to·ry (-dĭk′tə-rē) adj.
in′ter·dic′tive·ly adv.
in′ter·dic′tor n.

interdict

n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the exclusion of a person or all persons in a particular place from certain sacraments and other benefits, although not from communion
2. (Law) civil law any order made by a court or official prohibiting an act
3. (Law) Scots law an order having the effect of an injunction
4. (Historical Terms) Roman history
a. an order of a praetor commanding or forbidding an act
b. the procedure by which this order was sought
vb (tr)
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms) to place under legal or ecclesiastical sanction; prohibit; forbid
6. (Military) military to destroy (an enemy's lines of communication) by firepower
[C13: from Latin interdictum prohibition, from interdīcere to forbid, from inter- + dīcere to say]
ˌinterˈdictive, ˌinterˈdictory adj
ˌinterˈdictively adv
ˌinterˈdictor n

in•ter•dict

(n. ˈɪn tərˌdɪkt; v. ˌɪn tərˈdɪkt)
n.
1. any prohibitory act or decree of a court or an administrative officer.
2. a punishment by which the faithful, remaining in communion with the Roman Catholic Church, are forbidden certain sacraments and prohibited from participation in certain sacred acts.
v.t.
3. to forbid; prohibit.
4. to cut off authoritatively from certain ecclesiastical functions and privileges.
5.
a. to impede the flow of (troops, supplies, etc.) or hinder the use of (a road, airfield, etc.) by steady ground fire or bombing.
b. to impede the shipment of (supplies, contraband, etc.) by military operations or other aggressive measures.
[1250–1300; Middle English enterdit < Old French < Latin interdictum prohibition =inter- inter- + dīcere to speak;]
in`ter•dic′tor, n.
in`ter•dic′to•ry, adj.

interdict


Past participle: interdicted
Gerund: interdicting

Imperative
interdict
interdict
Present
I interdict
you interdict
he/she/it interdicts
we interdict
you interdict
they interdict
Preterite
I interdicted
you interdicted
he/she/it interdicted
we interdicted
you interdicted
they interdicted
Present Continuous
I am interdicting
you are interdicting
he/she/it is interdicting
we are interdicting
you are interdicting
they are interdicting
Present Perfect
I have interdicted
you have interdicted
he/she/it has interdicted
we have interdicted
you have interdicted
they have interdicted
Past Continuous
I was interdicting
you were interdicting
he/she/it was interdicting
we were interdicting
you were interdicting
they were interdicting
Past Perfect
I had interdicted
you had interdicted
he/she/it had interdicted
we had interdicted
you had interdicted
they had interdicted
Future
I will interdict
you will interdict
he/she/it will interdict
we will interdict
you will interdict
they will interdict
Future Perfect
I will have interdicted
you will have interdicted
he/she/it will have interdicted
we will have interdicted
you will have interdicted
they will have interdicted
Future Continuous
I will be interdicting
you will be interdicting
he/she/it will be interdicting
we will be interdicting
you will be interdicting
they will be interdicting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been interdicting
you have been interdicting
he/she/it has been interdicting
we have been interdicting
you have been interdicting
they have been interdicting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been interdicting
you will have been interdicting
he/she/it will have been interdicting
we will have been interdicting
you will have been interdicting
they will have been interdicting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been interdicting
you had been interdicting
he/she/it had been interdicting
we had been interdicting
you had been interdicting
they had been interdicting
Conditional
I would interdict
you would interdict
he/she/it would interdict
we would interdict
you would interdict
they would interdict
Past Conditional
I would have interdicted
you would have interdicted
he/she/it would have interdicted
we would have interdicted
you would have interdicted
they would have interdicted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interdict - an ecclesiastical censure by the Roman Catholic Church withdrawing certain sacraments and Christian burial from a person or all persons in a particular district
animadversion, censure - harsh criticism or disapproval
2.interdict - a court order prohibiting a party from doing a certain activity
court order - a writ issued by a court of law requiring a person to do something or to refrain from doing something
ban, proscription, prohibition - a decree that prohibits something
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Verb1.interdict - destroy by firepower, such as an enemy's line of communication
destroy, destruct - do away with, cause the destruction or undoing of; "The fire destroyed the house"
2.interdict - command against; "I forbid you to call me late at night"; "Mother vetoed the trip to the chocolate store"; "Dad nixed our plans"
command, require - make someone do something
ban - prohibit especially by legal means or social pressure; "Smoking is banned in this building"
bar, debar, exclude - prevent from entering; keep out; "He was barred from membership in the club"
enjoin - issue an injunction
criminalise, illegalise, illegalize, outlaw, criminalize - declare illegal; outlaw; "Marijuana is criminalized in the U.S."

interdict

verb
1. prohibit, bar, ban, prevent, veto, forbid, outlaw, disallow, proscribe, debar, criminalize Troops could be ferried in to interdict drug shipments.
noun
1. ban, veto, prohibition, taboo, disqualification, interdiction, disallowance The National Trust has placed an interdict on jet-skis.

interdict

verbnoun
A coercive measure intended to ensure compliance or conformity:
Translations

interdict

[ˈɪntədɪkt]
A. Nentredicho m, interdicto m
B. VT (= stop) [+ enemy shipping, aircraft, communications] → interceptar; (= prohibit) → prohibir

interdict

[ˈɪntərdɪkt] n (= ban) → interdit m
to place an interdict on sth → frapper qch d'interdit

interdict

vt
(Eccl) person, placemit dem Interdikt belegen; priestsuspendieren
(Mil: = intercept) plane, suppliesabfangen
n
(Jur) → Verbot nt
(Eccl) → Interdikt nt

interdict

[ˈɪntədɪkt] ninterdizione f
References in classic literature ?
Sternly he pronounc'd The rigid interdiction, which resounds Yet dreadful in mine eare, though in my choice Not to incur; but soon his cleer aspect Return'd and gratious purpose thus renew'd.
It is remarkable, that even in the two States which seem to have meditated an interdiction of military establishments in time of peace, the mode of expression made use of is rather cautionary than prohibitory.
Of course there is nothing to be said, if you regard the interdiction that rests upon you as quite insurmountable.
Enhanced communication and cooperation between the United States, international partners, and Cuba, particularly in terms of real-time information-sharing, would likely lead to increased interdictions and disruptions of illegal drug trafficking.
WMD interdiction operations differ from other types of interdictions in that they take place in potentially toxic environments and that advanced technical proficiency is required for the identification and exploitation of the suspected WMD.
And it is clearly a worthwhile endeavor, having led to at least 11 interdictions.
The PSI takes these efforts out of the ad hoc realm by facilitating information-sharing, building relationships between international counterparts at the political and operational levels, and providing a forum for experts to share best practices on organizing for and conducting interdictions.
While Cuban interdictions are down, the number of Cuban arrivals in South Florida on smuggling and other organized trips is up--with 546 more landings in fiscal 2006 than 2005, according to Border Patrol figures.
Reasons given include not wanting to provoke North Korea, wanting to avoid possible reprisals for cooperating with the United States, fearing that interdictions on the high seas will jeopardize international trade and undermine international law, and not perceiving the PSI as a top security priority.
We are part of a team and the interdictions are a product of combined synergies of maritime patrol aircraft, Coast Guard cutters and helicopters.
With the issuance of the Kennebunkport Order in response to a surge of interdictions following the coup in Haiti, Bush unequivocally rejected the extraterritorial application of U.
But implementing interdictions on the high seas in order to block shipments of weapons of mass destruction will require a U.