interest group

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Related to interest-group: Special Interest Group

interest group

n.
A group of persons working on behalf of or strongly supporting a particular cause, such as an industry or an item of legislation.

in′terest group`


n.
a group of people drawn or acting together because of a common interest, concern, or purpose.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interest group - (usually plural) a social group whose members control some field of activity and who have common aimsinterest group - (usually plural) a social group whose members control some field of activity and who have common aims; "the iron interests stepped up production"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
social group - people sharing some social relation
special interest - an individual or group who are concerned with some particular part of the economy and who try to influence legislators or bureaucrats to act in their favor
vested interest - groups that seek to control a social system or activity from which they derive private benefit
References in periodicals archive ?
We have relatively little to say about normative issues, that is, what the implications of this interest-group behavior are on sound judicial selection.
In the future, they argue, these are the only two alternatives: Either all the interest groups represented in the Democrat coalition get in the boat and row together, or political candidates should stand aside completely from the interest-group mess.
Interest-Group Liberalism and Juridicial Democracy: Two Theses in Search of Legitimacy.
While the notion of interest-group politics is not new, Klyza believes that a lack of understanding of the original "idea" accounts for the failure of several administrations to enact reforms or develop consistent policies for natural resources.
He is right to applaud the political mobilization of an excluded group and to admire the New Mexican tribes for mastering interest-group politics.
On the final page of his classic study of interest-group politics, The Governmental Process, published in 1960, David Truman wrote, "On examining the country's stormy past one may in bewilderment conclude that 'the Lord takes care of drunkards, little children, and the United States of America.
As support for parties and turnout in elections has declined, interest-group membership has grown.
In that respect, lobbyists, politicians, and interest-group professionals are like lawyers: Though some clients lose, the fee takers, as a class, all win.
With opponents of the plan outspending proponents by two to one, a study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, independent health-care philanthropy, found that slightly over half of the lawmakers who responded said that interest-group advertising "had a great deal of impact on the [health-care] debate.