interfirm

interfirm

(ˌɪntəˈfɜːm)
adj
occurring between two or more companies
References in periodicals archive ?
Explaining Interfirm Cooperation; Limits of the Transaction-Cost Approach.
And what are the implications of interfirm diversity for alliance managers?
The resulting approach offered an explanation for interfirm differences in both realized performance and current opportunities in terms of the unique development of each firm's resource set.
Most tests of whether interfirm variations in corporate governance practices affect firms' market value or performance come up empty.
Furthermore, there is a correlation between an SME's involvement in interfirm networking and the establishment of effective knowledge management systems.
The proposed rule had a definition of an accounting firm "affiliate" that would have prohibited virtually any business association or relationship, including interfirm networks.
This suggests supply chain management is the management of close interfirm relationships, so understanding partnering is important to develop successful retail supply chain relationships.
Yet, the two sections individually highlight phenomena (intersectoral rather than interfirm competition, and the degree of difference in financial systems in different parts of Germany) that do not get as much press as perhaps they should.
The specific strategy a firm employs is dependent upon the local labor market, internal capacity and organizational structure, technological change, and interfirm dependency and linkages.
Communication, perhaps the most important process in interfirm relations (Bleeke and Ernst, 1993), has been associated with the process of coordination (Guiltinan, Rejah, and Rogers, 1980).
According to this new and growing literature, Fordism as a form of production organisation has shown a relative decline in advanced industrialised countries (especially in Europe) while production based on interfirm cooperation has expanded [Rasmussen, Schmitz, and van Dijk (1992)].
Interfirm relationships consisting of both "vertical" (subcontracting) and "horizontal" ("confrere" trading among small firm owners) types are first examined, including social characteristics, entrepreneurship among the founders and their successors, and the innovation process.