interject


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in·ter·ject

 (ĭn′tər-jĕkt′)
tr.v. in·ter·ject·ed, in·ter·ject·ing, in·ter·jects
1. To say or mention suddenly, often in interrupting the remarks of another: "I disagree," she interjected.
2. To insert between other elements; interpose: interjected some new images into the presentation. See Synonyms at introduce.
3. To assert (oneself) in a situation in which one has not previously been involved.

[Latin intericere, interiect- : inter-, inter- + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

in·ter·jec′tor n.
in′ter·jec′to·ry (-jĕk′tə-rē) adj.

interject

(ˌɪntəˈdʒɛkt)
vb (tr)
1. to interpose abruptly or sharply; interrupt with; throw in: she interjected clever remarks.
2. archaic to come between; interpose
[C16: from Latin interjicere to place between, from jacere to throw]
ˌinterˈjector n

in•ter•ject

(ˌɪn tərˈdʒɛkt)

v.t.
to insert, often abruptly, between other things; interpolate: to interject a remark.
[1570–80; < Latin interjectus, past participle of intericere to throw between, insert =inter- inter- + -icere, comb. form of jacere to throw]
in`ter•jec′tor, n.

interject


Past participle: interjected
Gerund: interjecting

Imperative
interject
interject
Present
I interject
you interject
he/she/it interjects
we interject
you interject
they interject
Preterite
I interjected
you interjected
he/she/it interjected
we interjected
you interjected
they interjected
Present Continuous
I am interjecting
you are interjecting
he/she/it is interjecting
we are interjecting
you are interjecting
they are interjecting
Present Perfect
I have interjected
you have interjected
he/she/it has interjected
we have interjected
you have interjected
they have interjected
Past Continuous
I was interjecting
you were interjecting
he/she/it was interjecting
we were interjecting
you were interjecting
they were interjecting
Past Perfect
I had interjected
you had interjected
he/she/it had interjected
we had interjected
you had interjected
they had interjected
Future
I will interject
you will interject
he/she/it will interject
we will interject
you will interject
they will interject
Future Perfect
I will have interjected
you will have interjected
he/she/it will have interjected
we will have interjected
you will have interjected
they will have interjected
Future Continuous
I will be interjecting
you will be interjecting
he/she/it will be interjecting
we will be interjecting
you will be interjecting
they will be interjecting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been interjecting
you have been interjecting
he/she/it has been interjecting
we have been interjecting
you have been interjecting
they have been interjecting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been interjecting
you will have been interjecting
he/she/it will have been interjecting
we will have been interjecting
you will have been interjecting
they will have been interjecting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been interjecting
you had been interjecting
he/she/it had been interjecting
we had been interjecting
you had been interjecting
they had been interjecting
Conditional
I would interject
you would interject
he/she/it would interject
we would interject
you would interject
they would interject
Past Conditional
I would have interjected
you would have interjected
he/she/it would have interjected
we would have interjected
you would have interjected
they would have interjected
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.interject - to insert between other elements; "She interjected clever remarks"
cut off, disrupt, interrupt, break up - make a break in; "We interrupt the program for the following messages"

interject

verb interrupt with, put in, interpose, introduce, throw in, interpolate He listened thoughtfully, interjecting only the odd word.

interject

verb
To put or set into, between, or among another or other things:
Translations
يقول كلمةً إعْتِراضِيَّه
přerušitskočit do řečivložit
indskyde
közbevet
skjóta inn í
arada söylemek

interject

[ˌɪntəˈdʒekt] VT [+ question, remark] → interponer
"that's not true," he interjected-eso no es cierto -interpuso él

interject

vt remark, questioneinwerfen; …, he interjected…, rief er dazwischen

interject

[ˌɪntəˈdʒɛkt] vtintervenire (con)

interjection

(intəˈdʒekʃən) noun
1. a word or words, or some noise, used to express surprise, dismay, pain or other feelings and emotions. Oh dear! I think I've lost my key; Ouch! That hurts!
2. the act of interjecting something.
ˌinterˈject verb
to say (something) which interrupts what one, or someone else, is saying.
References in classic literature ?
Fyne, childlike enough in her wonder and pain, pausing now and then to interject the pitiful query: "It was cruel of her.
interject African-based concepts, explanatory paradigms and experiential knowledge into the various strands of the dominan feminist discourse.
Creak, creak aching joints interject, Sounds to be expected in retrospect.
I was tempted to interject that this was nonsense - that the Iron Lady was responsible for an achievement of which anyone would be proud.
When you do stand-up and they laugh with you, you can interject a couple of serious points and it's a great way to educate people about who we are and what we are.
It would be equally inappropriate to allow lawyers to interject themselves into the claims process just so they could charge veterans for assistance in obtaining their earned benefits.
I see no matter the subject, individuals still have to interject Liberalism and their own narrow-minded views, even a columnist for Risk & Insurance[R].
It kind of makes you want to interject with a Homer Simpson-like "d'oh," but apparently there are far too many managers who don't get it--and this seems to be a global state of affairs.
The temptation to interject a comment or ask a question will be overwhelming; it must be resisted.
Sometimes the instructor would interject additional questions, within an on-going discussion.
He was bemoaning my criticism of current Education Secretary Rod Paige earlier in the week for what I viewed as Paige's offensive comments about values other than those derived from Christianity and the need to interject religion into public schools.