interlope

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in·ter·lop·er

 (ĭn′tər-lō′pər)
n.
1. One that interferes with the affairs of others, often for selfish reasons; a meddler.
2. One that intrudes in a place, situation, or activity: "When these interlopers choke out native species, ecologists see a danger signal" (William K. Stevens).
3. Archaic
a. One that trespasses on a trade monopoly, as by conducting unauthorized trade in an area designated to a chartered company.
b. A ship or other vessel used in such trade.

[inter- + probably Middle Dutch lōper, runner (from lōpen, to run).]

in′ter·lope′ v.
Word History: The word interloper has its origin in the time when England was embarking on the course that would lead to the British Empire. Interloper is first recorded in the late 1500s in connection with the Muscovy Company, the earliest major English trading company (chartered in 1555). The word was soon being used in connection with independent traders competing with the East India Company (chartered in 1600). These companies were established as monopolies, and independent traders, called interlopers, were not welcome. The term is probably partly derived from Dutch, the language of one of the great trade rivals of the English at that time. The inter- is simply the prefix inter-, which English has borrowed from Latin, meaning "between, among." The element -loper is probably related to the same element in landloper, "vagabond," a word adopted from Dutch landloper, with the same sense and composed of land, "land," and loper, from lopen, "to run, leap." The word interloper soon came to be used in the extended sense "meddler, person who intrudes in others' affairs" by the 1630s.

interlope

(ˌɪntəˈləʊp; ˈɪntəˌləʊp)
vb (intr)
to intrude or interfere in the affairs of others

in•ter•lope

(ˌɪn tərˈloʊp, ˈɪn tərˌloʊp)

v.i. -loped, -lop•ing.
1. to thrust oneself into the domain or affairs of others.
2. to intrude into some region or field of trade without a proper license.
[1595–1605]
in′ter•lop`er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.interlope - encroach on the rights of others, as in trading without a proper license
intervene, step in, interfere, interpose - get involved, so as to alter or hinder an action, or through force or threat of force; "Why did the U.S. not intervene earlier in WW II?"

interlope

verb
To intervene officiously or indiscreetly in the affairs of others:
References in periodicals archive ?
THERE were a couple of weeks when David Pipe interloped into Paul Nicholls' domination of the big weekend races, but things have returned to normal this month and everything looks set for another bumper harvest for the master of Ditcheat this afternoon.
The philosophical thing to do, perhaps, would be to dismiss the widespread devastation as the inevitable result of nature reclaiming what man has interloped upon.