intermission


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in·ter·mis·sion

 (ĭn′tər-mĭsh′ən)
n.
An interval between periods of activity, as between the acts of a play. See Synonyms at pause.

[Middle English intermissioun, from Old French intermission, from Latin intermissiō, intermissiōn-, from intermissus, past participle of intermittere, to interrupt; see intermit.]

intermission

(ˌɪntəˈmɪʃən)
n
1. (Theatre) an interval, as between parts of a film
2. a period between events or activities; pause
3. the act of intermitting or the state of being intermitted
[C16: from Latin intermissiō, from intermittere to leave off, intermit]
ˌinterˈmissive adj

in•ter•mis•sion

(ˌɪn tərˈmɪʃ ən)

n.
1. a short interval allowing a rest between the acts of a play or parts of a performance.
2. a period during which action temporarily ceases; an interval between periods of activity.
3. the act of intermitting or the state of being intermitted.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin intermissiō interruption]
in`ter•mis′sive (-ˈmɪs ɪv) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intermission - the act of suspending activity temporarilyintermission - the act of suspending activity temporarily
pause - temporary inactivity
2.intermission - a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of somethingintermission - a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something
interval, time interval - a definite length of time marked off by two instants
lapse - a break or intermission in the occurrence of something; "a lapse of three weeks between letters"
blackout - a suspension of radio or tv broadcasting
caesura - a pause or interruption (as in a conversation); "after an ominous caesura the preacher continued"
dead air - an inadvertent interruption in a broadcast during which there is no sound
delay, postponement, time lag, wait, hold - time during which some action is awaited; "instant replay caused too long a delay"; "he ordered a hold in the action"
halftime - an intermission between the first and second half of a game
rest period, rest, respite, relief - a pause for relaxation; "people actually accomplish more when they take time for short rests"
time-out - a brief suspension of play; "each team has two time-outs left"
letup, lull - a pause during which things are calm or activities are diminished; "there was never a letup in the noise"

intermission

noun interval, break, pause, stop, rest, suspension, recess, interruption, respite, lull, stoppage, interlude, cessation, let-up (informal), breathing space, entr'acte Drinks were served during the intermission.

intermission

noun
1. The condition of being temporarily inactive:
2. A pause or interval, as from work or duty:
Informal: breather.
Translations
إسْتِراحَه، فَتْرَة إسْتِراحَه
přestávka
afbrydelsepause
hlé
pārtraukumspauze
odmor

intermission

[ˌɪntəˈmɪʃən] N (= pause) → interrupción f, intermisión f; (between events) → intervalo m (Theat) → intermedio m
it went on without intermissioncontinuó sin interrupción

intermission

[ˌɪntərˈmɪʃən] n (THEATRE, CINEMA)entracte m

intermission

n
Unterbrechung f, → Pause f
(Theat, Film) → Pause f

intermission

[ˌɪntəˈmɪʃn] n (pause) → interruzione f, pausa (Theatre, Cine) → intervallo

intermission

(intəˈmiʃən) noun
a usually short pause or gap between two (television or radio) programmes, parts of a programme, play etc.
References in classic literature ?
Immovable as that rock, of which each appeared to form a part, they lay, with their eyes roving, without intermission, along the dark margin of trees, that bounded the adjacent shores of the narrow stream.
But though his whole life was now become one watch on deck; and though the Parsee's mystic watch was without intermission as his own; yet these two never seemed to speak --one man to the other --unless at long intervals some passing unmomentous matter made it necessary.
She must allow him to be still frequently coming to look; any thing less would certainly have been too little in a lover; and he was ready at the smallest intermission of the pencil, to jump up and see the progress, and be charmed.
She wondered, with little intermission what could be the reason of it; was sure there must be some bad news, and thought over every kind of distress that could have befallen him, with a fixed determination that he should not escape them all.
Linton and his daughter would frequently walk out among the reapers; at the carrying of the last sheaves they stayed till dusk, and the evening happening to be chill and damp, my master caught a bad cold, that settled obstinately on his lungs, and confined him indoors throughout the whole of the winter, nearly without intermission.
He thought of these concessions, and looked at Magdalen, and smirked and simpered without intermission.
Now that he had no work to hold, he laid the knuckles of the right hand in the hollow of the left, and then the knuckles of the left hand in the hollow of the right, and then passed a hand across his bearded chin, and so on in regular changes, without a moment's intermission.
At the coach window, as at the dinner-party, he hovered about us without a moment's intermission, like a great vulture: gorging himself on every syllable that I said to Agnes, or Agnes said to me.
I fled, but he pursu'd (though more, it seems, Inflam'd with lust then rage) and swifter far, Me overtook his mother all dismaid, And in embraces forcible and foule Ingendring with me, of that rape begot These yelling Monsters that with ceasless cry Surround me, as thou sawst, hourly conceiv'd And hourly born, with sorrow infinite To me, for when they list into the womb That bred them they return, and howle and gnaw My Bowels, their repast; then bursting forth Afresh with conscious terrours vex me round, That rest or intermission none I find.
On the second morning, about eleven o'clock, the king himself in person, attended by his nobility, courtiers, and officers, having prepared all their musical instruments, played on them for three hours without intermission, so that I was quite stunned with the noise; neither could I possibly guess the meaning, till my tutor informed me.
The desire of getting out of the reach of the Galles made us press forward with great expedition, and, indeed, fear having entirely engrossed our minds, we were perhaps less sensible of all our labours and difficulties; so violent an apprehension of one danger made us look on many others with unconcern; our pains at last found some intermission at the foot of the mountains of Duan, the frontier of Abyssinia, which separates it from the country of the Moors, through which we had travelled.
At the foot of the rocks were some rudely constructed houses looking more like ruins than houses, from among which came, they perceived, the din and clatter of blows, which still continued without intermission.