intermission

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in·ter·mis·sion

 (ĭn′tər-mĭsh′ən)
n.
An interval between periods of activity, as between the acts of a play. See Synonyms at pause.

[Middle English intermissioun, from Old French intermission, from Latin intermissiō, intermissiōn-, from intermissus, past participle of intermittere, to interrupt; see intermit.]

intermission

(ˌɪntəˈmɪʃən)
n
1. (Theatre) an interval, as between parts of a film
2. a period between events or activities; pause
3. the act of intermitting or the state of being intermitted
[C16: from Latin intermissiō, from intermittere to leave off, intermit]
ˌinterˈmissive adj

in•ter•mis•sion

(ˌɪn tərˈmɪʃ ən)

n.
1. a short interval allowing a rest between the acts of a play or parts of a performance.
2. a period during which action temporarily ceases; an interval between periods of activity.
3. the act of intermitting or the state of being intermitted.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin intermissiō interruption]
in`ter•mis′sive (-ˈmɪs ɪv) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intermission - the act of suspending activity temporarilyintermission - the act of suspending activity temporarily
pause - temporary inactivity
2.intermission - a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of somethingintermission - a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something
interval, time interval - a definite length of time marked off by two instants
lapse - a break or intermission in the occurrence of something; "a lapse of three weeks between letters"
blackout - a suspension of radio or tv broadcasting
caesura - a pause or interruption (as in a conversation); "after an ominous caesura the preacher continued"
dead air - an inadvertent interruption in a broadcast during which there is no sound
delay, postponement, time lag, wait, hold - time during which some action is awaited; "instant replay caused too long a delay"; "he ordered a hold in the action"
halftime - an intermission between the first and second half of a game
rest period, rest, respite, relief - a pause for relaxation; "people actually accomplish more when they take time for short rests"
time-out - a brief suspension of play; "each team has two time-outs left"
letup, lull - a pause during which things are calm or activities are diminished; "there was never a letup in the noise"

intermission

noun interval, break, pause, stop, rest, suspension, recess, interruption, respite, lull, stoppage, interlude, cessation, let-up (informal), breathing space, entr'acte Drinks were served during the intermission.

intermission

noun
1. The condition of being temporarily inactive:
2. A pause or interval, as from work or duty:
Informal: breather.
Translations
إسْتِراحَه، فَتْرَة إسْتِراحَه
přestávka
afbrydelsepause
hlé
pārtraukumspauze
odmor

intermission

[ˌɪntəˈmɪʃən] N (= pause) → interrupción f, intermisión f; (between events) → intervalo m (Theat) → intermedio m
it went on without intermissioncontinuó sin interrupción

intermission

[ˌɪntərˈmɪʃən] n (THEATRE, CINEMA)entracte m

intermission

n
Unterbrechung f, → Pause f
(Theat, Film) → Pause f

intermission

[ˌɪntəˈmɪʃn] n (pause) → interruzione f, pausa (Theatre, Cine) → intervallo

intermission

(intəˈmiʃən) noun
a usually short pause or gap between two (television or radio) programmes, parts of a programme, play etc.
References in classic literature ?
The white-cap student who won the second fight witnessed the remaining three, and talked with us during the intermissions.
The same man, stimulated by private pique against the MEGARENSIANS,[2] another nation of Greece, or to avoid a prosecution with which he was threatened as an accomplice of a supposed theft of the statuary Phidias,[3] or to get rid of the accusations prepared to be brought against him for dissipating the funds of the state in the purchase of popularity,[4] or from a combination of all these causes, was the primitive author of that famous and fatal war, distinguished in the Grecian annals by the name of the PELOPONNESIAN war; which, after various vicissitudes, intermissions, and renewals, terminated in the ruin of the Athenian commonwealth.
It will not be said by those who recollect that the Atlantic coast is the longest side of the Union, that during the term of thirteen years, the representatives of the States have been almost continually assembled, and that the members from the most distant States are not chargeable with greater intermissions of attendance than those from the States in the neighborhood of Congress.
Permit me to advise you to take the intermissions as much as possible for your attentions to your grandmother, who must be attended to properly.
He must moreover, with intermissions, still have been lifted and borne; since why and how else should he have known himself, later on, with the afternoon glow intenser, no longer at the foot of his stairs - situated as these now seemed at that dark other end of his tunnel - but on a deep window-bench of his high saloon, over which had been spread, couch-fashion, a mantle of soft stuff lined with grey fur that was familiar to his eyes and that one of his hands kept fondly feeling as for its pledge of truth.
For both the pause reinforceth the new onset; and if a man that is not perfect, be ever in practice, he shall as well practise his errors, as his abilities, and induce one habit of both; and there is no means to help this, but by seasonable intermissions.
In the one-minute intermissions Ponta's seconds worked over him as they had not worked before.
But though his whole life was now become one watch on deck; and though the Parsee's mystic watch was without intermission as his own; yet these two never seemed to speak --one man to the other --unless at long intervals some passing unmomentous matter made it necessary.
She must allow him to be still frequently coming to look; any thing less would certainly have been too little in a lover; and he was ready at the smallest intermission of the pencil, to jump up and see the progress, and be charmed.
She wondered, with little intermission what could be the reason of it; was sure there must be some bad news, and thought over every kind of distress that could have befallen him, with a fixed determination that he should not escape them all.
Linton and his daughter would frequently walk out among the reapers; at the carrying of the last sheaves they stayed till dusk, and the evening happening to be chill and damp, my master caught a bad cold, that settled obstinately on his lungs, and confined him indoors throughout the whole of the winter, nearly without intermission.
On the second morning, about eleven o'clock, the king himself in person, attended by his nobility, courtiers, and officers, having prepared all their musical instruments, played on them for three hours without intermission, so that I was quite stunned with the noise; neither could I possibly guess the meaning, till my tutor informed me.