internal-combustion engine


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internal-combustion engine
one cycle of a four-stroke diesel engine
A. intake stroke
B. compression stroke
C. power stroke
D. exhaust stroke

in·ter·nal-com·bus·tion engine

(ĭn-tûr′nəl-kəm-bŭs′chən)
n.
An engine, such as an automotive gasoline piston engine or a diesel, in which fuel is burned within the engine proper rather than in an external furnace, as in a steam engine.

internal-combustion engine

n
(Automotive Engineering) a heat engine in which heat is supplied by burning the fuel in the working fluid (usually air)

inter′nal-combus′tion en`gine


n.
an engine of one or more working cylinders in which the process of combustion takes place within the cylinders.
[1880–85]
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internal-combustion engine
cycles of a four-stroke diesel engine
A. intake stroke: the piston moves down, drawing air and fuel into the cylinder
B. compression stroke: the piston moves up, compressing and heating the air and fuel mixture
C. power stroke: the hot air and fuel mixture ignites, forcing the piston down
D. exhaust stroke: the piston moves up, forcing the exhaust gases out of the cylinder

in·ter·nal-com·bus·tion engine

(ĭn-tûr′nəl-kəm-bŭs′chən)
An engine whose fuel is burned inside the engine itself rather than in an outside furnace or burner. Gasoline and diesel engines are internal-combustion engines; a steam engine is not.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.internal-combustion engine - a heat engine in which combustion occurs inside the engine rather than in a separate furnaceinternal-combustion engine - a heat engine in which combustion occurs inside the engine rather than in a separate furnace; heat expands a gas that either moves a piston or turns a gas turbine
diesel engine, diesel motor, diesel - an internal-combustion engine that burns heavy oil
cylinder block, engine block, block - a metal casting containing the cylinders and cooling ducts of an engine; "the engine had to be replaced because the block was cracked"
four-stroke engine, four-stroke internal-combustion engine - an internal-combustion engine in which an explosive mixture is drawn into the cylinder on the first stroke and is compressed and ignited on the second stroke; work is done on the third stroke and the products of combustion are exhausted on the fourth stroke
gas engine - an internal-combustion engine similar to a gasoline engine but using natural gas instead of gasoline vapor
gasoline engine, petrol engine - an internal-combustion engine that burns gasoline; most automobiles are driven by gasoline engines
heat engine - any engine that makes use of heat to do work
force feed, force-feed lubricating system, lubricating system, pressure feed, pressure-feed lubricating system - mechanical system of lubricating internal combustion engines in which a pump forces oil into the engine bearings
motorboat, powerboat - a boat propelled by an internal-combustion engine
automotive vehicle, motor vehicle - a self-propelled wheeled vehicle that does not run on rails
outboard motor, outboard - internal-combustion engine that mounts at stern of small boat
poppet, poppet valve - a mushroom-shaped valve that rises perpendicularly from its seat; commonly used in internal-combustion engines
radial engine, rotary engine - an internal-combustion engine having cylinders arranged radially around a central crankcase
reciprocating engine - an internal-combustion engine in which the crankshaft is turned by pistons moving up and down in cylinders
rotary engine - an internal-combustion engine in which power is transmitted directly to rotating components
self-starter - an electric starting motor that automatically starts an internal-combustion engine
supercharger - compressor that forces increased oxygen into the cylinders of an internal-combustion engine
valve-in-head engine - internal-combustion engine having both inlet and exhaust valves located in the cylinder head
Translations

internal-combustion engine

[ɪnˌtɜːnlkəmˈbʌstʃnˌɛndʒɪn] nmotore m a combustione interna or a scoppio
References in periodicals archive ?
The vans use both a traditional gasoline-powered internal-combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor.
Scuderi says its design is able to achieve compression cylinder pressures equal to that of a conventional internal-combustion engine during the combustion cycle, thus creating large amounts of turbulence for improved atomization of the fuel/air mix.
The fuel cell, which chemically converts hydrogen to electricity (with water as a byproduct), has the potential to eventually replace the internal-combustion engine, because its far more than just the best environmental choice.
Gasoline automobiles (and the internal-combustion engine which burns gasoline) took over the auto industry for three primary reasons: (1) in 1901, vast oil reserves were discovered in Texas; (2) in 1912, a viable electric starter for gasoline engines was introduced; and (3) Henry Ford decided to mass-produce gasoline-burning cars.
The coming of the internal-combustion engine, especially the Otto four-stroke engine (see 1876), offered a much better hope.
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BAT shares are up nearly 400 percent in 1998, gaining on news that the company has developed a technology that lets a modified internal-combustion engine propel a standard-size car at least 80 miles on a single gallon of fuel.
Although battery-powered electric cars seem to be finally about to find their place on the world's roads (see Consumer News this issue), they may prove to be an interim technology in the race to replace the internal-combustion engine with something cleaner.