internecine


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Related to internecine: Internecine war

in·ter·nec·ine

 (ĭn′tər-nĕs′ēn′, -ĭn, -nē′sīn′)
adj.
1. Of or relating to struggle within a nation, organization, or group.
2. Mutually destructive; ruinous or fatal to both sides.
3. Characterized by bloodshed or carnage.

[Latin internecīnus, destructive, variant of internecīvus, from internecāre, to slaughter : inter-, intensive pref.; see inter- + nex, nec-, death; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]
Word History: When is a mistake not a mistake? In language at least, the answer to this question is "When everyone adopts it," and on rare occasions, "When it's in the dictionary." The word internecine presents a case in point. Today, it usually has the meaning "relating to internal struggle," but in the first known attestation of internecine, dating from 1663, it is used with the meaning "fought to the death" as part of the phrase internecine war. How the word acquired its more common modern sense is an interesting story in the history of English. The Latin source of the word, spelled both internecīnus and internecīvus, meant "fought to the death, murderous." It is a derivative of the verb necāre, "to kill." The prefix inter- was here used not in the usual sense "between, mutual" but rather as an intensifier meaning "all the way, to the death." Samuel Johnson was unaware of this fact when he was working on his great dictionary in the 18th century. He included internecine in his dictionary but misunderstood the prefix and defined the word as "endeavoring mutual destruction." Johnson was not taken to task for this error. On the contrary, his dictionary was so popular and considered so authoritative that this error became widely adopted as correct usage. The error was further compounded when internecine acquired the sense "relating to internal struggle." This story thus illustrates how dictionaries are often viewed as providing norms and how the ultimate arbiter in language, even for the dictionary itself, is popular usage.

internecine

(ˌɪntəˈniːsaɪn) or

internecive

adj
1. mutually destructive or ruinous; maiming both or all sides: internecine war.
2. of or relating to slaughter or carnage; bloody
3. of or involving conflict within a group or organization
[C17: from Latin internecīnus, from internecāre to destroy, from necāre to kill]

in•ter•ne•cine

(ˌɪn tərˈni sin, -saɪn, -ˈnɛs in, -ˈnɛs aɪn)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to conflict or struggle within a group: an internecine feud.
2. mutually destructive.
3. characterized by great slaughter; deadly.
[1655–65; < Latin internecīnus, internecīvus murderous, derivative of internecāre to exterminate]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.internecine - (of conflict) within a group or organization; "an internecine feud among proxy holders"
internal - happening or arising or located within some limits or especially surface; "internal organs"; "internal mechanism of a toy"; "internal party maneuvering"
2.internecine - characterized by bloodshed and carnage for both sides; "internecine war"
bloody - having or covered with or accompanied by blood; "a bloody nose"; "your scarf is all bloody"; "the effects will be violent and probably bloody"; "a bloody fight"

internecine

adjective destructive, bloody, deadly, fatal, mortal, exterminating, ruinous, exterminatory The episode has turned attention to the internecine strife here.
Translations

internecine

[ˌɪntəˈniːsaɪn]
A. ADJ [strife, feud, warfare] → intestina
B. CPD internecine war Nguerra f de aniquilación mutua

internecine

[ˌɪntərˈniːsaɪn] adj [conflict, war, quarrel] → mutuellement destructeur/trice

internecine

adj
(= mutually destructive)für beide Seiten verlustreich; (= bloody)mörderisch; internecine wargegenseitiger Vernichtungskrieg
(= internal) quarrel, conflictintern; internecine strifeinnere Zerrissenheit

internecine

[ˌɪntəˈnisaɪn] adjdistruttivo/a per entrambe le parti
References in classic literature ?
Add to this that there are two young Englanders in the house, who hate all the Americans in a lump, making between them none of the distinctions and favourable comparisons which they insist upon, and you will, I think, hold me warranted in believing that, between precipitate decay and internecine enmities, the English-speaking family is destined to consume itself; and that with its decline the prospect of general pervasiveness, to which I alluded above, will brighten for the deep-lunged children of the Fatherland!
A typical illustration of the internecine strife that permeated all society.
It was the only battle which I have ever witnessed, the only battle-field I ever trod while the battle was raging; internecine war; the red republicans on the one hand, and the black imperialists on the other.
Labour's internecine rifts are now deepening to such an extent, however, that the only questions left to answer are when he will go, how he will go and who will replace him.
Reports suggest that hundreds of militants on both sides have so far been killed in the internecine clashes.
1 (BNA): Bahrain is able to thwart foreign-backed designs which aim at fueling internecine strife, said Egyptian journalist Al-Sayyed Al-Babli.
A visit to her grandparents' farm in the country reveals the abject poverty the couple came to the city to escape, and the internecine marital strife that threatens to be born anew.
I attended a number of meetings where Labour internecine war raged openly.
Is there something in the water in Canberra that makes Australia's politicians consume each other in campaigns of internecine fighting rather than actually working for the best interests of the nation as a whole?
But in Pakistan, the ruling elite across the political divide continues with its shenanigans and internecine conflicts.
THE internecine feud between Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg is the kind of scrap Formula One has been crying out for years.
The GOP's internecine conflict began at the party's March convention, when Mr.