interoceanic

interoceanic

(ˈɪntərˌəʊʃɪˈænɪk)
adj
involving, connecting, or moving between two or more oceans
References in periodicals archive ?
The project will boost up trans-border integration and help expand the regions access to international markets through the interoceanic corridor linking the Atlantic with the Pacific and connecting the cities of Coquimbo (Chile) with San Juan (Argentina) and Porto Alegre (Brazil).
Fermin had realized that the navigability of the Napo opened the possibility of an interoceanic corridor, beginning from Manta, on the Pacific coast of Ecuador, crossing the Ecuadorian Andes by road, transferring to river at an Amazonian port on the Napo, continuing to Manaus, and concluding in the Atlantic port of Belem.
The first was issued in February for allegedly having received US$20 million from Odebrecht in exchange for adjudication of the Interoceanic Highway during his presidency.
Though Nicaragua appears keen on its implementation, the $50 billion Interoceanic Grand Canal project, as it is known, would not automatically translate into economic prosperity for the impoverished region for the next 50 years at least, much like the Panama Canal.
Mining has especially afflicted Honduras and Guatemala, while Nicaragua's countryside is currently at odds with an interoceanic canal.
Other anthropogenic activities such as the construction of the Interoceanic highway PeruBrazil, mining, and oil and gas extraction might generate general and localized impacts (Finer et al.
Squire presento a los accionistas de la compania Honduras Interoceanic Railway el reporte preliminar sobre la ruta de construccion de un canal seco para ferrocarril interoceanico que uniria el golfo de Fonseca, en el Oceano Pacifico, con la costa de La Mosquitia, en el Caribe.
Leading a research team organised by the Societe de Geographie, the Geographical Society of Paris, in 1876 de Lesseps founded the company La Societe Civile Internationale du Canal Interoceanique de Darien--the International Congress for Study of an Interoceanic Canal.
In the following two decades, large numbers of Chinese (also called at the time "sons of the Celestial Empire") went to gold-rush California, Peru, Panama (to build an interoceanic railroad line), and Central America and British possessions in the Caribbean.