interpreter

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Related to Interpreters: Linkers, assemblers, Compilers

in·ter·pret·er

 (ĭn-tûr′prĭ-tər)
n.
1. One who translates orally from one language into another.
2. One who gives or expounds an interpretation: "An actor is an interpreter of other men's words, often a soul which wishes to reveal itself to the world" (Alec Guinness).
3. Computers A program that executes other programs.

interpreter

(ɪnˈtɜːprɪtə)
n
1. a person who translates orally from one language into another
2. a person who interprets the work of others
3. (Computer Science) computing
a. a program that translates a second program to machine code one statement at a time and causes the execution of the resulting code as soon as the translation is completed
b. a machine that interprets the holes in a punched card and prints the corresponding characters on that card
inˈterpreterˌship n

in•ter•pret•er

(ɪnˈtɜr prɪ tər)

n.
1. a person who interprets, esp. a person who translates orally for speakers of different languages.
2. computer hardware or software that transforms a program instruction written in a high-level language into machine language and executes it before proceeding to the next instruction.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French]

interpreter

A program checking, translating, and carrying out a written program one statement at a time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interpreter - someone who mediates between speakers of different languagesinterpreter - someone who mediates between speakers of different languages
go-between, intercessor, intermediary, intermediator, mediator - a negotiator who acts as a link between parties
dragoman - an interpreter and guide in the Near East; in the Ottoman Empire in the 18th and 19th centuries a translator of European languages for the Turkish and Arab authorities and most dragomans were Greek (many reached high positions in the government)
symboliser, symbolizer, symbolist - someone skilled in the interpretation or representation of symbols
2.interpreter - someone who uses art to represent something; "his paintings reveal a sensitive interpreter of nature"; "she was famous as an interpreter of Shakespearean roles"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
3.interpreter - an advocate who represents someone else's policy or purpose; "the meeting was attended by spokespersons for all the major organs of government"
advocate, advocator, exponent, proponent - a person who pleads for a cause or propounds an idea
ambassador - an informal representative; "an ambassador of good will"
flack, flack catcher, flak, flak catcher - a slick spokesperson who can turn any criticism to the advantage of their employer
mouthpiece, mouth - a spokesperson (as a lawyer)
spokesman - a male spokesperson
spokeswoman - a female spokesperson
4.interpreter - (computer science) a program that translates and executes source language statements one line at a time
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
computer program, computer programme, programme, program - (computer science) a sequence of instructions that a computer can interpret and execute; "the program required several hundred lines of code"

interpreter

noun
1. translator, linguist, metaphrast, paraphrast Speaking through an interpreter, he said he was disappointed.
2. performer, player, presenter, exponent Freni is one of the supreme interpreters of Puccini's heroines.
Translations
مُتَرْجِمٌمُتَرْجِم، مُفَسِّر
tlumočník-iceinterpret
tolk
ترگمان
tulkki
tumačinterpretatorinterpreter
tolmács
túlkur
通訳者
통역사
interpret
tlmočník
tolmač
tumačтумач
tolk
ล่าม
người phiên dịch

interpreter

[ɪnˈtɜːprɪtəʳ] Nintérprete mf

interpreter

[ɪnˈtɜːrprɪr] ninterprète mf
to speak through an interpreter → s'exprimer par la voix de son interprète

interpreter

n
Dolmetscher(in) m(f); (Theat, Mus) → Interpret(in) m(f); (of dreams)Traumdeuter(in) m(f)
(Comput) → Interpreter m

interpreter

[ɪnˈtɜːprɪtəʳ] ninterprete m/f

interpret

(inˈtəːprit) verb
1. to translate a speaker's words, while he is speaking, into the language of his hearers. He spoke to the audience in French and she interpreted.
2. to explain the meaning of. How do you interpret these lines of the poem?
3. to show or bring out the meaning of (eg a piece of music) in one's performance of it. The sonata was skilfully interpreted by the pianist.
inˌterpreˈtation noun
inˈterpreter noun
a person who translates the words of a speaker into the language of his hearers.

interpreter

مُتَرْجِمٌ tlumočník tolk Dolmetscher διερμηνέας intérprete tulkki interprète tumač interprete 通訳者 통역사 tolk tolk interpretator intérprete переводчик tolk ล่าม mütercim người phiên dịch 译员

interpreter

n. intérprete.

interpreter

n intérprete mf
References in classic literature ?
I then descended to the courts of justice; over which the judges, those venerable sages and interpreters of the law, presided, for determining the disputed rights and properties of men, as well as for the punishment of vice and protection of innocence.
One is that the judges, who are to be the interpreters of the law, might receive an improper bias, from having given a previous opinion in their revisionary capacities; the other is that by being often associated with the Executive, they might be induced to embark too far in the political views of that magistrate, and thus a dangerous combination might by degrees be cemented between the executive and judiciary departments.
Without having been in the school of the Abbe Faria, the worthy master of The Young Amelia (the name of the Genoese tartan) knew a smattering of all the tongues spoken on the shores of that large lake called the Mediterranean, from the Arabic to the Provencal, and this, while it spared him interpreters, persons always troublesome and frequently indiscreet, gave him great facilities of communication, either with the vessels he met at sea, with the small boats sailing along the coast, or with the people without name, country, or occupation, who are always seen on the quays of seaports, and who live by hidden and mysterious means which we must suppose to be a direct gift of providence, as they have no visible means of support.
He was living like a patriarch, surrounded by laborers and interpreters, all snugly housed, and provided with excellent farms.
Had affection, goodness, modesty, real talent, ever employed those bright orbs as interpreters, I do not think I could have refrained from giving a kind and encouraging, perhaps an ardent reply now and then; but as it was, I found pleasure in answering the glance of vanity with the gaze of stoicism.
At long intervals, however, some intrepid captain will touch on the skirts of the bay, with two or three armed boats' crews and accompanied by interpreters.
The company consisted of twenty-three shareholders, or partners, but held in its employ about two thousand persons as clerks, guides, interpreters, and "voyageurs," or boatmen.
I may as well take this occasion to remark, that all the subsequent conversation in which the Mummy took a part, was carried on in primitive Egyptian, through the medium (so far as concerned myself and other untravelled members of the company) -- through the medium, I say, of Messieurs Gliddon and Buckingham, as interpreters.
We could converse with our captors only through the medium of interpreters who spoke both Chinese and Abyssinian.
If this visit be unexpected, madam," answered Lord Fellamar, "my eyes must have been very faithless interpreters of my heart, when last I had the honour of seeing you; for surely you could not otherwise have hoped to detain my heart in your possession, without receiving a visit from its owner.
Kirsch emerging presently from the neighbourhood of the hold, where he had been bellowing instructions intermingled with polyglot oaths to the ship's men engaged in secreting the passengers' luggage, came to give an account of himself to his brother interpreters.
Sometimes interpreters were called in; whom Mr Meagles addressed in such idiomatic terms of speech, as instantly to extinguish and shut up--which made the matter worse.