interpsychic

interpsychic

(ˌɪntəˈsaɪkɪk)
adj
(Psychology) psychol occurring between two or more minds
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense, this type of language has, in Vygotsky's view, a correlation with the transition from interpsychic functions to intrapsychic functions.
Vygotsky (1931/1983; 1934/1993), while studying ontogenetic development, laid out the genetic law of cultural development: every psychic function appears on the scene twice on two planes, first social and then psychological; first among people in an interpsychic manner, and then in the interior of the subject, in an intrapsychic way.
is the very process through which a person becomes a certain kind of subject owning certain identities in the social realm, identities constituted through material, cultural, economic, and interpsychic relations.
Moving on, a thought provoking aspect of Laing's work was his interpsychic L.
Vygotsky argues that egocentric speech marks a transitional stage "from interpsychic to intrapsychic functioning, i.
Cultural scripts for sexual behavior evidenced in this research are more similar for Blacks and whites than are the interpersonal or interpsychic scripts that are more family related.
Sorting out the interpsychic states of adolescents as they think about cutting and then cut themselves is a difficult task, even for a mental health clinician with experience and training in this area.
She differentiates between the phallic or intrapsychic mode, which does not distinguish between you as an independently existing subject and you as a fantasy extension of my wishes and desires, and the interpsychic female mode, she calls intersubjectivity, which acknowledges the existence of the other and deals with the space between the I and the you as well as the space within me.
Sandhu (1997) said, "there are wide cultural differences in emotional scripts, social bonding practices, and psychological mechanisms to defend against intrapsychic and interpsychic threats among Asian and mainstream American cultures" (p.
In contrast, a psychological model implies or assumes a psychogenic etiology rooted in intrapsychic, interpsychic or social factors that would more likely be amendable to a counselling-based therapeutic approach.
Faulkner's writing persistently explores the interpsychic relations among human subjects.