interracialism

interracialism

the principles, beliefs, and attitudes influencing actions aimed at improving relations among differing races. — interracial, adj.
See also: Race
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126) Battat consistently deploys this strategy of invoking then dismissing a more nuanced critical perspective in favour of a kind of cultural idealism that inflates the concepts of integration and interracialism.
The Fatherhood of God and the Brotherhood of Man": The Social Gospel Interracialism of the Southern Sociological Congress" (Ph.
Through a close reading of the proceedings of innumerable organizations and a detailed case study of the Mexican American-led Community Service Organization (CSO), she demonstrates that fighting Communism created meaningful bonds among liberal groups whose interracialism was central to their successes, including their ability to tap into and support other reform communities.
Individual chapter topics include the role of city normal schools and municipal colleges in higher education for African Americans, white racial anxiety and black student presence at six Midwest universities, interracialism at Fisk University in 1930, and the National Scholarship Service and Fund for Negro Students, 1947-1968.
This article explores how this horror-comedy articulates different discourses regarding interracialism, conjoined twins, and monstrosity in ways that reveal much about American ideas about race, selfhood, and identity.
The egalitarian vision of the younger generation was expressed in the international work of the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) and its groundbreaking interracialism.
Early twentieth-century intellectuals like Franz Boas and Gilberto Freyre, and more contemporarily, Michael Lind (1998) and Orlando Patterson (1998), have understood interracialism as a powerful symbol if not an outright means through which a semblance of racial utopia could be achieved (Kennedy 2003).
145) Lewis conceived of this outpouring of arts and letters as an exercise in interracialism presaging the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.
Plough, 1998); Tracy Elaine K'Meyer, Interracialism and Christian Community in the Postwar South: The Story of Koinonia Farm (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1997); and Jack Holland, "A Vision on a Hill: Recalling Marycrest, an inspiring experiment in Christian community," at www.
This demonstration in interracialism was a success for Harlem's children.
He needed these images of black and white men together not only to give legitimacy to his private erotic photographic enterprise, but also to convince himself that he was doing the right thing in fostering harmonious interracialism through his social and artistic activities.
Although it would be wrong to romanticize the radical possibilities of interracialism at the turn of the century, interracial clubs of the early period did provide a place for blacks and whites to come together in relative equality--to deliberately share space, food, drinks, sociability and affection--as well as to manipulate and take advantage of each other.