interracially


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Adv.1.interracially - by race; "interracially restrictive"
References in periodicals archive ?
The establishment of interracial spaces and acting interracially were essential to building acceptance for more equitable human relations, initially in the Deep South and later replicated by WIMS veterans in Northern urban communities such as Chicago, Philadelphia, and Boston.
He was interracially married, so he came down to Haiti to live, and that's how I struck up with him.
This study utilized logistic regression to test whether students' personal characteristics and experiences significantly predict their likelihood of dating interracially in college.
60) Despite this, as noted earlier in this essay, a growing number of African-American women are marrying interracially.
To frame the picture another way, the average black person was 137 times more likely to rob interracially than the average white person: 192 versus 1.
Read in light of that campaign, the Administration's argument in Palmore that "[t]he Equal Protection Clause does not 'protect' certain racial classes to the exclusion of others; it protects all persons from invidious racial classification" must have appeared to the Justices directed less at the possibility that black parents who married interracially might be subject to the same rules and more to the broader question of whether the race of the victim "matters" in equal protection adjudication.
In Japan the number of people who marry interracially or inter-ethnically is increasing, but changes to naming practices must occur for Japan to become a multicultural society.
Moreover, black men are more likely than black women to date and marry interracially, further reducing the already limited supply of middle-class black men available for marriage (pp.
Bestselling author and founder/pastor of Potter's House Church in highly respected internationally, interracially, and interdenominationally.
Utilizing data from marriage and census records as well as newspaper accounts, this paper demonstrates that during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Chinese American men in Massachusetts did indeed marry interracially, indicating that historical Chinese American communities were more complex and heterogeneous than are commonly portrayed.
The experience of interracially adopted individuals highlights the complexity of racial identity development.
Homogamy Over the Net: Using Internet Advertisements to Discover Who Interracially Dates.