interregnum


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in·ter·reg·num

 (ĭn′tər-rĕg′nəm)
n. pl. in·ter·reg·nums or in·ter·reg·na (-nə)
1. The interval of time between the end of a sovereign's reign and the accession of a successor.
2. A period of temporary suspension of the usual functions of government or control.
3. A gap in continuity.

[Latin : inter-, inter- + rēgnum, reign; see reign.]

in′ter·reg′nal (-nəl) adj.

interregnum

(ˌɪntəˈrɛɡnəm)
n, pl -nums or -na (-nə)
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an interval between two reigns, governments, incumbencies, etc
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any period in which a state lacks a ruler, government, etc
3. a period of absence of some control, authority, etc
4. a gap in a continuity
[C16: from Latin, from inter- + regnum reign]
ˌinterˈregnal adj

in•ter•reg•num

(ˌɪn tərˈrɛg nəm)

n., pl. -nums, -na (-nə).
1. an interval of time between the close of a sovereign's reign and the accession of the normal or legitimate successor.
2. any period during which a state is without a permanent ruler.
3. any pause or interruption in continuity.
[1570–80; < Latin =inter- inter- + rēgnum reign]
in`ter•reg′nal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interregnum - the time between two reigns, governments, etc.
interim, meantime, meanwhile, lag - the time between one event, process, or period and another; "meanwhile the socialists are running the government"
Translations

interregnum

[ˌɪntəˈregnəm] N (interregnums or interregna (pl)) [ˌɪntəˈregnə]interregno m

interregnum

[ˌɪntərˈrɛgnəm] ninterrègne m

interregnum

n pl <-s or interregna> → Interregnum nt

interregnum

[ˌɪntəˈrɛgnəm] ninterregno
References in classic literature ?
The interregnum has been long, both as to time and distance.
During this interregnum we begin a very original and interesting series of maneuvers.
Hilbery lived in a house which was accurately numbered in order with its fellows, and that he filled up forms, paid rent, and had seven more years of tenancy to run, he had an excuse for laying down laws for the conduct of those who lived in his house, and this excuse, though profoundly inadequate, he found useful during the interregnum of civilization with which he now found himself faced.
The presidential interregnum has lasted for nearly 11 months so far.
In the course of her exposition she finds that following the establishment of the classical consensus that finance merely intermediates and investment, there were essentially two waves in critical theories of finance--the first from the turn of the 20th century until the middle of the century and the second beginning in the 1970s--separated by an interregnum in which critical views of finance were concerned primarily with the interpretation of past history and coincided with the Keynesian boom after World War II.
At times considerable explanatory weight is placed on the disruptions of the Interregnum despite the fact that, as Professor Cressy freely admits, we know all too little of the scale and impact of those disruptions.
Derian also used his visit to urge Lebanon to elect a president to end its nearly yearlong interregnum.
In the only monograph on Leonbruno since Girolamo Prandi's of 1825, Ventura sifts through documents and works to establish a more complete portrait of this court painter, who had his greatest success during the interregnum between the death of Mantegna (1506) and the arrival of Giulio Romano (1524).
Similarly, during the Interregnum such middle-class prophets as Mary Cary, Anna Trapnel, and Margaret Fell, whom Richey bundles together into a single chapter, found in the Apocalypse support for their prophetic authority.
The speaker added that his party would continue its efforts to end the presidential interregnum and would oppose any attempt to paralyze state institutions.
reassess the reign of sultan Sa'id, which has otherwise been portrayed as a dull interregnum of little interest to scholars, and officially as a harsh, despotic, and conservative tyranny gratefully ended by the coup of the current ruler in 1970.
of London) works thematically through the development of the secular legal profession from 1558 to 1660, including the emergence of its powerful oratory and narrative, the elaboration of its other oral traditions such as communal dining, its transition to text and symbol, its elements of theater, its relationship to the English state, and its fates under Charles I (in which the Inns of Court declined in their independence and influence), in the unsettled period in which the nation seemed to rule itself by means of pamphlet, and during the Interregnum.