interregnum

(redirected from interregnums)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

in·ter·reg·num

 (ĭn′tər-rĕg′nəm)
n. pl. in·ter·reg·nums or in·ter·reg·na (-nə)
1. The interval of time between the end of a sovereign's reign and the accession of a successor.
2. A period of temporary suspension of the usual functions of government or control.
3. A gap in continuity.

[Latin : inter-, inter- + rēgnum, reign; see reign.]

in′ter·reg′nal (-nəl) adj.

interregnum

(ˌɪntəˈrɛɡnəm)
n, pl -nums or -na (-nə)
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an interval between two reigns, governments, incumbencies, etc
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any period in which a state lacks a ruler, government, etc
3. a period of absence of some control, authority, etc
4. a gap in a continuity
[C16: from Latin, from inter- + regnum reign]
ˌinterˈregnal adj

in•ter•reg•num

(ˌɪn tərˈrɛg nəm)

n., pl. -nums, -na (-nə).
1. an interval of time between the close of a sovereign's reign and the accession of the normal or legitimate successor.
2. any period during which a state is without a permanent ruler.
3. any pause or interruption in continuity.
[1570–80; < Latin =inter- inter- + rēgnum reign]
in`ter•reg′nal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interregnum - the time between two reigns, governments, etc.
interim, meantime, meanwhile, lag - the time between one event, process, or period and another; "meanwhile the socialists are running the government"
Translations

interregnum

[ˌɪntəˈregnəm] N (interregnums or interregna (pl)) [ˌɪntəˈregnə]interregno m

interregnum

[ˌɪntərˈrɛgnəm] ninterrègne m

interregnum

n pl <-s or interregna> → Interregnum nt

interregnum

[ˌɪntəˈrɛgnəm] ninterregno
References in classic literature ?
The interregnum has been long, both as to time and distance.
During this interregnum we begin a very original and interesting series of maneuvers.
Hilbery lived in a house which was accurately numbered in order with its fellows, and that he filled up forms, paid rent, and had seven more years of tenancy to run, he had an excuse for laying down laws for the conduct of those who lived in his house, and this excuse, though profoundly inadequate, he found useful during the interregnum of civilization with which he now found himself faced.
The most frightening periods in history have often been interregnums -- moments between the death of one king and the rise of the next.
Summary: The most frightening periods in history have often been interregnums -- moments between the death of one king and the rise of the next.
This is the volatile glycerine driving Kim Echlin's novel, The Disappeared, which attempts to give shape to the interregnums of mayhem that have impacted Cambodia, like asteroids that hit with no warning.
He thus presents an intellectual biography of these three figures, focusing primarily on the broad contours of their economic ideas, punctuating his three core narratives with interregnums that show important connecting developments in the field of economics.
I remember as a young person the bitterness of the Diefenbaker-Pearson Years and of course the brief interregnums of Joe Clark and John Turner.