intersect

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in·ter·sect

 (ĭn′tər-sĕkt′)
v. in·ter·sect·ed, in·ter·sect·ing, in·ter·sects
v.tr.
1. To cut across or through: The path intersects the park.
2. To form an intersection with; cross: The road intersects the highway a mile from here.
v.intr.
1. To cut across or overlap each other: circles intersecting on a graph.
2. To form an intersection; cross: These two fences intersect at the creek.

[Latin intersecāre, intersect- : inter-, inter- + secāre, to cut; see sek- in Indo-European roots.]

intersect

(ˌɪntəˈsɛkt)
vb
1. to divide, cut, or mark off by passing through or across
2. (esp of roads) to cross (each other)
3. (Mathematics) maths (often foll by with) to have one or more points in common (with another configuration)
[C17: from Latin intersecāre to divide, from inter- + secāre to cut]

in•ter•sect

(ˌɪn tərˈsɛkt)
v.t.
1. to cut or divide by passing through or across: The highway intersects the town.
v.i.
2. to cross, as lines or wires.
3. Geom. to have one or more points in common: intersecting lines.
[1605–15; < Latin intersectus, past participle of intersecāre to cut through, sever =inter- inter- + secāre to cut]

intersect


Past participle: intersected
Gerund: intersecting

Imperative
intersect
intersect
Present
I intersect
you intersect
he/she/it intersects
we intersect
you intersect
they intersect
Preterite
I intersected
you intersected
he/she/it intersected
we intersected
you intersected
they intersected
Present Continuous
I am intersecting
you are intersecting
he/she/it is intersecting
we are intersecting
you are intersecting
they are intersecting
Present Perfect
I have intersected
you have intersected
he/she/it has intersected
we have intersected
you have intersected
they have intersected
Past Continuous
I was intersecting
you were intersecting
he/she/it was intersecting
we were intersecting
you were intersecting
they were intersecting
Past Perfect
I had intersected
you had intersected
he/she/it had intersected
we had intersected
you had intersected
they had intersected
Future
I will intersect
you will intersect
he/she/it will intersect
we will intersect
you will intersect
they will intersect
Future Perfect
I will have intersected
you will have intersected
he/she/it will have intersected
we will have intersected
you will have intersected
they will have intersected
Future Continuous
I will be intersecting
you will be intersecting
he/she/it will be intersecting
we will be intersecting
you will be intersecting
they will be intersecting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been intersecting
you have been intersecting
he/she/it has been intersecting
we have been intersecting
you have been intersecting
they have been intersecting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been intersecting
you will have been intersecting
he/she/it will have been intersecting
we will have been intersecting
you will have been intersecting
they will have been intersecting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been intersecting
you had been intersecting
he/she/it had been intersecting
we had been intersecting
you had been intersecting
they had been intersecting
Conditional
I would intersect
you would intersect
he/she/it would intersect
we would intersect
you would intersect
they would intersect
Past Conditional
I would have intersected
you would have intersected
he/she/it would have intersected
we would have intersected
you would have intersected
they would have intersected
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.intersect - meet at a point
cross - meet and pass; "the trains crossed"
encounter, meet, run across, come across, run into, see - come together; "I'll probably see you at the meeting"; "How nice to see you again!"

intersect

verb cross, meet, cut, divide, cut across, bisect, crisscross The centre of the city is intersected by the main waterways.

intersect

verb
To pass through or over:
Translations
يَتَقاطَع
křižovat sepřetínat se
krydse hinanden
leikata
skera
kirtimasissusikirtimo vieta
krustotkrustotiesšķērsot
križovať sapretínať sa
kesişmekkesmek

intersect

[ˌɪntəˈsekt]
A. VT (Math) → cortar
B. VI (Math) → cortarse, intersecarse; [roads] → cruzarse

intersect

[ˌɪntərˈsɛkt]
vt (= cross) → couper, croiser
The satellite is on a course which should intersect that of the asteroid → Le satellite est sur une trajectoire qui devrait croiser celle de l'astéroïde.
to be intersected by [+ road, river] → être à l'intersection de
(MATHEMATICS)intersecter
vi [lines, roads] → se croiser
(MATHEMATICS)s'intersecter

intersect

vtdurchschneiden; (Geometry) → schneiden
visich kreuzen; (Geometry, in set theory) → sich schneiden; intersecting setsSchnittmengen pl

intersect

[ˌɪntəˈsɛkt]
1. vt (Math) → intersecare
2. vi (Math) → intersecarsi; (roads) → incrociarsi, intersecarsi

intersect

(intəˈsekt) verb
to divide (eg lines or roads) by cutting or crossing. The line AB intersects the line CD at X; Where do the two roads intersect?
ˌinterˈsection (-ʃən) noun
1. the act of intersecting.
2. a place where lines, roads etc intersect. The crash occurred at the intersection (between the two roads).
References in classic literature ?
But the important point to notice, is that these cells are always made at that degree of nearness to each other, that they would have intersected or broken into each other, if the spheres had been completed; but this is never permitted, the bees building perfectly flat walls of wax between the spheres which thus tend to intersect.
The flat intermediate country was intersected by a labyrinth of tidal streams, winding up from the invisible sea in strange fantastic curves -- rivers at high water, and channels of mud at low.
At such a time I found out for certain, that this bleak place overgrown with nettles was the churchyard; and that Philip Pirrip, late of this parish, and also Georgiana wife of the above, were dead and buried; and that Alexander, Bartholomew, Abraham, Tobias, and Roger, infant children of the aforesaid, were also dead and buried; and that the dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard, intersected with dykes and mounds and gates, with scattered cattle feeding on it, was the marshes; and that the low leaden line beyond, was the river; and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing, was the sea; and that the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry, was Pip.
The relative situation of these States; the number of rivers with which they are intersected, and of bays that wash there shores; the facility of communication in every direction; the affinity of language and manners; the familiar habits of intercourse; -- all these are circumstances that would conspire to render an illicit trade between them a matter of little difficulty, and would insure frequent evasions of the commercial regulations of each other.
The communication between the Western and Atlantic districts, and between different parts of each, will be rendered more and more easy by those numerous canals with which the beneficence of nature has intersected our country, and which art finds it so little difficult to connect and complete.
At the time the travellers passed over these prairies, some of the narrow, deep streams by which they were intersected were completely choked with salmon, which they took in great numbers.
These were intersected by deep valleys, formed by two branches of Big River, coming from the south of west, both of which they crossed.
He saw open pasture country, intersected with wooded canons, descending to the south and west from his feet, crease on crease and roll on roll, from lower level to lower level, to the floor of Petaluma Valley, flat as a billiard-table, a cardboard affair, all patches and squares of geometrical regularity where the fat freeholds were farmed.
Owing to the abundance of light reflected from the white and glittering surface, no shadows were cast on any part; and those lines which intersected the sky could alone be distinguished: hence the mass stood out in the boldest relief.
Having noticed that the number indicating the greatest depth was apparently in the centre of the map, I laid a rule on the map lengthwise, and then breadthwise, and found, to my surprise, that the line of greatest length intersected the line of greatest breadth exactly at the point of greatest depth, notwithstanding that the middle is so nearly level, the outline of the pond far from regular, and the extreme length and breadth were got by measuring into the coves; and I said to myself, Who knows but this hint would conduct to the deepest part of the ocean as well as of a pond or puddle?
The country was beautiful, intersected by valleys as green as the emerald.
Upon the large square in front of the hotel, the shadows of the tents, intersected by the golden moonbeams, formed as it were a huge mosaic of jet and yellow flagstones.