interstice


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in·ter·stice

 (ĭn-tûr′stĭs)
n. pl. in·ter·stic·es (-stĭ-sēz′, -sĭz)
A space, especially a small or narrow one, between things or parts: "There is a gleam of luminous gold, where the sinking western sun has found a first direct interstice in the clouds" (John Fowles).

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin interstitium, from *interstitus, past participle of intersistere, to pause, make a break : inter-, inter- + sistere, to cause to stand, set up; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

interstice

(ɪnˈtɜːstɪs)
n (usually plural)
1. a minute opening or crevice between things
2. (Chemistry) physics the space between adjacent atoms in a crystal lattice
[C17: from Latin interstitium interval, from intersistere, from inter- + sistere to stand]

in•ter•stice

(ɪnˈtɜr stɪs)

n., pl. -stic•es (-stəˌsiz, -stə sɪz)
1. a small or narrow space or interval between things or parts: the interstices between the slats of a fence.
2. an interval of time.
[1595–1605; < Latin interstitium=inter- inter- + -stit- (see superstition) + -ium -ium1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interstice - a small structural space between tissues or parts of an organ; "the interstices of a network"
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
areola - small space in a tissue or body part such as the area between veins on a leaf or an insect's wing
2.interstice - small opening between things
opening - a vacant or unobstructed space that is man-made; "they left a small opening for the cat at the bottom of the door"

interstice

noun
A space or interval between objects or points:
Translations

interstice

[ɪnˈtɜːstɪs] Nintersticio m

interstice

nZwischenraum m; (in wall etc also) → Sprung m, → Riss m; (between panels also) → Fuge f
References in classic literature ?
We all looked on with horrified amazement as we saw, when he stood back, the woman, with a corporeal body as real at that moment as our own, pass through the interstice where scarce a knife blade could have gone.
But he gave out his own thoughts, likewise, with an airy and fanciful glow; so that they glistened, as it were, through the arbor, and made their escape among the interstices of the foliage.
The fine powdery snow was driven past us in the clouds, penetrating the interstices of our clothes, and the pieces of ice which flew from the blows of Peter's ax were whisked into the air, and then dashed over the precipice.
So long as I travelled at a high velocity through time, this scarcely mattered; I was, so to speak, attenuated--was slipping like a vapour through the interstices of intervening substances
During this passage, Felton related everything to Milady--how, instead of going to London, he had chartered the little vessel; how he had returned; how he had scaled the wall by fastening cramps in the interstices of the stones, as he ascended, to give him foothold; and how, when he had reached the bars, he fastened his ladder.
But instead of the darkness, and the thick and mephitic atmosphere he had expected to find, Dantes saw a dim and bluish light, which, as well as the air, entered, not merely by the aperture he had just formed, but by the interstices and crevices of the rock which were visible from without, and through which he could distinguish the blue sky and the waving branches of the evergreen oaks, and the tendrils of the creepers that grew from the rocks.
A thing is dense, owing to the fact that its parts are closely combined with one another; rare, because there are interstices between the parts; smooth, because its parts lie, so to speak, evenly; rough, because some parts project beyond others.
D'Artagnan struck the barrels with his hand, and having ascertained that he spoke the truth, pushed his lantern, greatly to the captain's alarm, into the interstices between the barrels, and finding that there was nothing concealed in them:
But no sooner did she recollect where they were, than the bride peeped through the interstices of the leafy curtain, and saw that the outer room of the hut was deserted.
Green baize enveloped its contents, sewn carefully at the sides; I ripped the pack-thread with my pen-knife, and still, as the seam gave way, glimpses of gilding appeared through the widening interstices.
Inserted into the interstices of the huge stones which formed the pi-pi were large boughs of trees; hanging from the branches of which, and screened from the sun by their foliage, were innumerable little packages with leafy coverings, containing the meat of the numerous hogs which had been slain, done up in this manner to make it more accessible to the crowd.
She bent forward and touched the wood, so that the flames slipped in between the interstices of the coal.