intertextually

in·ter·tex·tu·al

 (ĭn′tər-tĕks′cho͞o-əl)
adj.
Relating to or deriving meaning from the interdependent ways in which texts stand in relation to each other.

in′ter·tex′tu·al′i·ty (-ăl′ĭ-tē) n.
in′ter·tex′tu·al·ly adv.

intertextually

(ˌɪntəˈtɛkstjʊəlɪ)
adv
in an intertextual manner
References in periodicals archive ?
With Abani's GraceLand, I have been especially interested in exploring some of the ways in which a single novel is intergenerically and intertextually engaged with other forms of intellectual and cultural property and some of the implications of this for thinking about the shape and shaping of world literary space and constructions of World Literature.
The Renaissance predilection for New Comedy models has proved to be so pervasive that Aristophanes has been only rarely imitated, adapted, satirised, or otherwise intertextually acknowledged.
The word "hauled" intertextually reechoes the word "loaded" which is cross-culturally insensitive.
The only way to convincingly codify narrational activity in Lolita is not in terms of the reliability of its narrator, but intertextually in terms of its competing rhetorics; and this is also the way I approach the female narrative in Alias Grace.
Scholars of Dante and Anglo-Saxon poetry particularly have demonstrated allegory to function intertextually.
The broadside pose of this spirited bull intertextually references his many brothers framed in similar broadside (object) positions in innumerable agricultural publications.
The author substantiates her book's analysis of the films intertextually as a way of identifying and clarifying their cultural meanings and impact on their contemporary audience.
Fair Margaret and Sweet William' and 'William and Margaret' are probably best regarded as separate but intertextually related pieces, representing different ways of handling a shared subject.
Read intertextually, these narrative styles suggest the possibility that McCarthy, despite the many similarities between his novel and "A Rose for Emily," was continuing Faulkner's work in the Southern Gothic tradition while also distancing his writing from Faulkner's influence.
While I am in accord with her basic argument, especially her reading of the difficulties that attend positivistic renderings of historical figures, the details of the argument occasionally fail to convince, especially in moments that are intertextually dense.
Since hermeneutics is essentially concerned with consensus, the same process that is carried out intratextually (within a single interview text) is also extended intertextually across interviews and considers commonalities and outliers across the data from one respondent to another (Thompson 1996; Patterson and Williams 2002, p.
equal footing and interpreted intertextually with Western sources.