interunion

interunion

(ˌɪntəˈjuːnjən)
n
the act of two or more things uniting or blending together
References in periodicals archive ?
He said that workers from different sectors and industries needed to unite as interunion labor unity was the only way to stop the largescale privatization of national assets by the government and its cronies.
Taher (1999) found that multiplicity of unions create a number of problems like intra-union and interunion rivalries among trade unions, increase in political influence among trade unions, developing militant attitudes among the leaders as well as the tendency to avoid collective bargaining process offered by the employer.
The Satellite Users Interference Reduction Group (SUIRG) and the World Broadcasting Union InterUnion Satellite Operations Group are also endorsing the course.
One labor scholar attributes this successful cross-state, interunion cooperation to the AFL's New Alliance Strategy.
Interunion cooperation was institutionalized through regional shop steward councils.
We could now put behind us pointless interunion competition and focus on fighting for our members in the workplace as one powerful union.
First, national differences in the contract and company law and in the taxation of insurance contracts deter interunion activity.
Unions bargain at the firm level (especially after the demise of pattern bargaining (59) and there is limited interunion cooperation, partly because the national confederation of unions, the AFL-CIO, is primarily a political force.
To the most conscious among Hollywood's unionists this is the moment to maximize member training and preparation, to stitch together interunion alliances, to deploy an effective strategic contract campaign and, most of all, to hone the guilds into a powerful, modern arm of the labor movement able to confront some of the mightiest corporations now operating in the global market.
Realizing how incomplete the history of one union alone would be, for the next half century, she pursued the history of all West Coast maritime unions, their cycles of victory and defeat, their interunion conflicts, their battles with employers, as well as the role played by government, from the President of the United States to the local sheriff.
A reactionary program, in turn, plays itself out here where there are all sorts of interethnic and interunion rivalries, and can lead to a "cut the best deal" mentality in which it is acceptable for one group of workers to gain at the expense of others.
Thus, for example, Valkenburg blames a lack of response to increasing individualization in the Netherlands on the resistance to change of the traditionally centralized Dutch union movement, and Stoleroff and Naumann show how interunion conflict hampered efforts to ameliorate the effects of the restructuring of the steel industry in Portugal.