intestinal

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in·tes·ti·nal

 (ĭn-tĕs′tə-nəl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or constituting the intestine: the intestinal wall; intestinal bacteria.

in·tes′ti·nal·ly adv.

in•tes•ti•nal

(ɪnˈtɛs tə nl; Brit. ˌɪn tɛsˈtaɪn l)

adj.
of, pertaining to, being in, or affecting the intestines.
[< New Latin]
in•tes′ti•nal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.intestinal - of or relating to or inside the intestines; "intestinal disease"

intestinal

adjective abdominal, visceral, duodenal, gut (informal), inner, coeliac, stomachic The intestinal tract is examined with a special viewing device.
Translations
مَعْوي
střevní
bél-
garna-, òarma-
črevný
bağırsaklara ait

intestinal

[ˌɪntesˈtaɪnl] ADJ [tract, complaint] → intestinal

intestinal

[ˌɪntɛˈstaɪnəl ɪnˈtɛstɪnəl] adjintestinal(e)
the intestinal wall → la paroi intestinale

intestinal

adjDarm-, intestinal (form); intestinal cancerDarmkrebs m

intestinal

[ɪnˈtɛstɪnl] adjintestinale

intestine

(inˈtestin) noun
(often in plural) the lower part of the food passage in man and animals.
intestinal (intesˈtainl) , ((especially American) inˈtestinl) adjective

in·tes·ti·nal

a. intestinal, rel. a los intestinos;
___ bypass surgerydesviación quirúrgica ___;
___ floraflora ___;
___ juicejugo ___;
___ obstructionobstrucción ___;
___ perforationperforación ___.

intestinal

adj intestinal
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, intestinally absorbed-oral insulin actually mimics insulin's natural location and gradients in the body by first passing through the liver before entering the bloodstream.
Dietary cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and triacylglycerols are transported in the blood by intestinally synthesized chylomicrons [2].
However, when some of the mice were intestinally colonized with segmented filamentous bacteria--common commensal inhabitants of the mouse gut--they developed the disease upon being immunized with the central nervous system antigens.
Indeed, in 1 study, 7% of healthy humans were found to be colonized intestinally with an ST131 strain (30); thus, humans may be the main reservoir for human-associated strains.
What is needed is a theoretical blueprint that intestinally defines the nature of law in the light of the understanding of modern complexities and realities and that creates space for normative contestations but which dynamically challenges the sensitivities encoded in citizenship obligations.