intestine


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Related to intestine: large intestine
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intestine
A. stomach
B. large intestine
C. small intestine
D. rectum
E. anus
F. appendix
G. cecum

in·tes·tine

 (ĭn-tĕs′tĭn)
n. often intestines
The portion of the digestive tract extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consisting of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine.
adj.
Internal; civil: the intestine affairs of the nation.

[Middle English, from Old French intestin, from Latin intestīna, intestines, from neuter pl. of intestīnus, internal, from intus, within; see en in Indo-European roots.]

intestine

(ɪnˈtɛstɪn)
n
(Anatomy) (usually plural) the part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anus. See large intestine, small intestine
[C16: from Latin intestīnum gut, from intestīnus internal, from intus within]
intestinal adj
inˈtestinally adv

in•tes•tine

(ɪnˈtɛs tɪn)

n.
1. Usu., intestines. the lower part of the alimentary canal, extending from the pylorus to the anus.
2. Also called small intestine. the narrow, longer part of the intestines, comprising the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, that serves to digest and absorb nutrients.
3. Also called large intestine. the broad, shorter part of the intestines, comprising the cecum, colon, and rectum, that absorbs water from and eliminates the residues of digestion.
adj.
4. internal; domestic; civil: intestine strife.
[1525–35; < Latin intestīnum, n. use of neuter of intestīnus internal]
click for a larger image
intestine

in·tes·tine

(ĭn-tĕs′tĭn)
The part of the digestive tract that extends from the stomach to the anus, consisting of the small intestine and large intestine. The intestine is a muscular tube in which most of the processes of digestion take place.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intestine - the part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anusintestine - the part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anus
internal organ, viscus - a main organ that is situated inside the body
hindgut - the caudal part of the alimentary canal in vertebrate embryos
small intestine - the longest part of the alimentary canal; where digestion is completed
large intestine - beginning with the cecum and ending with the rectum; includes the cecum and the colon and the rectum; extracts moisture from food residues which are later excreted as feces
abdomen, belly, stomach, venter - the region of the body of a vertebrate between the thorax and the pelvis
Translations
مَعْى
budellintestí
střevo
tarm
suolisuolisto
bél
görn, òarmur
腸管
zarnažarnų
zarna
intestin
črevo
inälvortarm
ลำไส้
ruột

intestine

[ɪnˈtestɪn] Nintestino m
small/large intestineintestino m delgado/grueso

intestine

[ɪnˈtɛstɪn] nintestin m large intestine, small intestine

intestine

nDarm m; small/large intestineDünn-/Dickdarm m

intestine

[ɪnˈtɛstɪn] nintestino
large intestine → (intestino) crasso
small intestine → (intestino) tenue m

intestine

(inˈtestin) noun
(often in plural) the lower part of the food passage in man and animals.
intestinal (intesˈtainl) , ((especially American) inˈtestinl) adjective

in·tes·tine

n. intestino, tubo digestivo que se extiende del píloro al ano;
large ______ grueso;
small ______ delgado.

intestine

n intestino, tripa (fam, frec. pl); large — intestino grueso, colon m; small — intestino delgado
References in classic literature ?
I upon my Frontieres here Keep residence; if all I can will serve, That little which is left so to defend Encroacht on still through our intestine broiles Weakning the Scepter of old Night: first Hell Your dungeon stretching far and wide beneath; Now lately Heaven and Earth, another World Hung ore my Realm, link'd in a golden Chain To that side Heav'n from whence your Legions fell: If that way be your walk, you have not farr; So much the neerer danger; goe and speed; Havock and spoil and ruin are my gain.
Now, in the midst of these intestine disquiets, we are threatened with an invasion from the island of Blefuscu, which is the other great empire of the universe, almost as large and powerful as this of his majesty.
And this precaution is no more than necessary for a prince every year engaged either in foreign wars or intestine commotions.
I hear the Holy Father Has sent a letter to the King of France Bidding him cross that shield of snow, the Alps, And make a peace in Italy, which will be Worse than a war of brothers, and more bloody Than civil rapine or intestine feuds.
small intestine of the sacrificial victim for purposes of divination
Not to tell over again his furlongs from spiracle to tail, and the yards he measures about the waist; only think of the gigantic involutions of his intestines, where they lie in him like great cables and hausers coiled away in the subterranean orlop-deck of a line-of-battle-ship.
The stomach and intestines were utterly empty; they contained nothing whatsoever.
Though he had heard my voice when I first addressed him, the sounds had come to him in a manner so contrary to his experience that he had made no answer, "seeing no man", as he expressed it, "and hearing a voice as it were from my own intestines.
Poisons act particularly on some organ or another -- one on the stomach, another on the brain, another on the intestines.
Sir," replied the wounded man, "believe me, there is no time to lose; the ball has broken the thigh bone and entered the intestines.
The body of the dog was opened, the intestines rigorously scrutinized, but, to the horror of all concerned, not a particle of the skin was to be found--the dog had been unjustly executed!
The brain it was customary to withdraw through the nose; the intestines through an incision in the side; the body was then shaved, washed, and salted; then laid aside for several weeks, when the operation of embalming, properly so called, began.