intolerance


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Related to intolerance: Food intolerance

in·tol·er·ance

 (ĭn-tŏl′ər-əns)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being intolerant; lack of tolerance.
2. Medicine Inability to digest or metabolize a food, drug, or other substance or compound: lactose intolerance.

in•tol•er•ance

(ɪnˈtɒl ər əns)

n.
1. lack of toleration; unwillingness or refusal to tolerate or respect contrary opinions or beliefs, persons of different races or backgrounds, etc.
2. abnormal sensitivity or allergy, as to heat or to a food or drug.
[1755–65; < Latin]

Intolerance

 
  1. Bigotry … it’s like putting your elbows on the table. You know you’re not supposed to. But there’s that instinct —Bonnie Currie, New York Times, January 24, 1986
  2. Closed as a bigot’s mind —Anon
  3. Intolerance itself is a form of egoism —George Santayana

    Santayana elaborates on his comparison of intolerance to egoism as follows: “And to condemn egoism intolerantly is to share it.”

  4. Intolerant as a sinner newly turned saint —Anon
  5. The mind of the bigot is like the pupil of the eye; the more light you pour upon it, the more it will contract —Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr
  6. Prejudice is as a mist, which in our journey through the world often dims the brightest and obscures the best of all the good and glorious objects that meet us on our way —Anthony Ashley Cooper
  7. Prejudices … are like rats, and men’s minds are like traps; prejudices get in easily, but it is doubtful if they ever get out —Lord Francis Jeffrey
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intolerance - impatience with annoyances; "his intolerance of interruptions"
impatience - a dislike of anything that causes delay
2.intolerance - unwillingness to recognize and respect differences in opinions or beliefs
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"
narrow-mindedness, narrowness - an inclination to criticize opposing opinions or shocking behavior
bigotry, dogmatism - the intolerance and prejudice of a bigot
fanaticism, fanatism, zealotry - excessive intolerance of opposing views
religionism - exaggerated religious zealotry
zero tolerance - extreme intolerance of antisocial behavior (usually by an uncompromising application of the law); "he urged zero tolerance for priests who abuse children sexually"
tolerance - willingness to recognize and respect the beliefs or practices of others

intolerance

intolerance

noun
Irrational suspicion or hatred of a particular group, race, or religion:
Translations
عَدَم تَساهُل أو تَحَمُّل
nesnášenlivost
intolerance
intolerancia
umburîarleysi
hoşgörüsüz olma

intolerance

[ɪnˈtɒlərəns] N (gen) → intolerancia f; (= bigotry) → intransigencia f (Med) → intolerancia f (to, of a) food intoleranceintolerancia f a los alimentos

intolerance

[ɪnˈtɒlərəns] nintolérance f

intolerance

n
Intoleranz f(of gegenüber)
(esp Med) → Überempfindlichkeit f(to, of gegen)

intolerance

[ɪnˈtɒlərns] nintolleranza

intolerable

(inˈtolərəbl) adjective
that cannot be endured or borne. intolerable pain; This delay is intolerable.
inˈtolerably adverb
inˈtolerant adjective
(often with of) unwilling to endure or accept eg people whose ideas etc are different from one's own, members of a different race or religion etc. an intolerant attitude; He is intolerant of others' faults.
inˈtolerance noun

in·tol·er·ance

n. intolerancia, incapacidad de soportar dolor o los efectos de una droga.

intolerance

n alergia, intolerancia; cold — intolerancia al frío; lactose — intolerancia a la lactosa; [Note: In Spanish alergia is used much more often than intolerancia when referring to medications.]
References in classic literature ?
There was unobstructed admittance on that side also; and at the door sat my old friend Nelly Dean, sewing and singing a song; which was often interrupted from within by harsh words of scorn and intolerance, uttered in far from musical accents.
Dick's standing in the shadow of the room, shutting up his knife, when we accompanied her to the Study; and of my aunt's rubbing her nose violently, by the way, as a mild vent for her intolerance of our military friend; but who got first into the Study, or how Mrs.
She relapsed into her listless attitude, and made a faint gesture of intolerance.
Our age is too enlightened to contend upon topics which concern only the interests of eternity; the men who hold in proper contempt all controversies about trifles, except such as inflame their own passions, have made it a commonplace censure against your ancestors, that their zeal was enkindled by subjects of trivial importance; and that however aggrieved by the intolerance of others, they were alike intolerant themselves.
If you will interpret the word INTOLERANCE as FIRMNESS OF PRINCIPLE, if you do not wish to condemn in the catholic soul of the Abbe de Sponde the stoicism which Walter Scott has made you admire in the puritan soul of Jeanie Deans' father; if you are willing to recognize in the Roman Church the Potius mori quam foedari that you admire in republican tenets,--you will understand the sorrow of the Abbe de Sponde when he saw in his niece's salon the apostate priest, the renegade, the pervert, the heretic, that enemy of the Church, the guilty taker of the Constitutional oath.
But all at once, a propos of nothing, there would come a phase of scepticism and indifference (everything happened in phases to me), and I would laugh myself at my intolerance and fastidiousness, I would reproach myself with being romantic.
The fresh subject of dispute ran on the spirit of religious intolerance which Mr.
There was not a soul for any of them to talk to except small farmers or fishermen; there were long winter evenings when the wind blew, whistling drearily through the leafless trees, and all around they saw nothing but the bare monotony of ploughed fields; and there was poverty, and there was lack of any work that seemed to matter; every kink in their characters had free play; there was nothing to restrain them; they grew narrow and eccentric: Philip knew all this, but in his young intolerance he did not offer it as an excuse.
Beginning with physical intolerance for alcohol, for years drinking only for the sake of comradeship and because alcohol was everywhere on the adventure-path, I had now reached the stage where my brain cried out, not merely for a drink, but for a drunk.
It ridicules the intolerance and sanctimonious hypocrisy of the Puritans as the Cavaliers insisted on seeing them in the person of the absurd Sir Hudibras and his squire Ralph (partly suggested by Cervantes' Don Quixote and Sancho).
Brown threw up his bothered brow and rapped on the spade handle with an intolerance quite unusual with him.
That what we falsely call a religious cry is easily raised by men who have no religion, and who in their daily practice set at nought the commonest principles of right and wrong; that it is begotten of intolerance and persecution; that it is senseless, besotted, inveterate and unmerciful; all History teaches us.