intonation


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in·to·na·tion

 (ĭn′tə-nā′shən, -tō-)
n.
1.
a. The act of intoning or chanting.
b. An intoned utterance.
2. A manner of producing or uttering tones, especially with regard to accuracy of pitch.
3. Linguistics The use of changing pitch to convey syntactic information: a questioning intonation.
4. A use of pitch characteristic of a speaker or dialect: "He could hear authority, the old parish intonation coming back into his voice" (Graham Greene).
5. Music The opening phrase of a plainsong composition sung as a solo part.

in′to·na′tion·al adj.

intonation

(ˌɪntəʊˈneɪʃən)
n
1. (Phonetics & Phonology) the sound pattern of phrases and sentences produced by pitch variation in the voice
2. the act or manner of intoning
3. an intoned, chanted, or monotonous utterance; incantation
4. (Classical Music) music the opening of a piece of plainsong, sung by a soloist
5. (Classical Music) music
a. the correct or accurate pitching of intervals
b. the capacity to play or sing in tune. See also just intonation
ˌintoˈnational adj

in•to•na•tion

(ˌɪn toʊˈneɪ ʃən, -tə-)

n.
1. the pattern or melody of pitch changes in connected speech, esp. the pitch pattern of a sentence, which distinguishes kinds of sentences or speakers of different language cultures.
2. the act or manner of intonating.
3. the ability to produce musical tones on pitch.
4. something that is intoned.
5. the opening phrase of a Gregorian chant.
[< Medieval Latin]
in`to•na′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intonation - rise and fall of the voice pitchintonation - rise and fall of the voice pitch  
prosody, inflection - the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
intonation pattern - intonations characteristic of questions and requests and statements
droning, monotone, drone - an unchanging intonation
singsong - a regular and monotonous rising and falling intonation
2.intonation - singing by a soloist of the opening piece of plainsong
singing, vocalizing - the act of singing vocal music
3.intonation - the act of singing in a monotonous toneintonation - the act of singing in a monotonous tone
singing, vocalizing - the act of singing vocal music
cantillation - liturgical chanting
4.intonation - the production of musical tones (by voice or instrument); especially the exactitude of the pitch relations
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
fixed intonation - the intonation of keyboard instruments where the pitch of each note is fixed and cannot be varied by the performer

intonation

noun
1. tone, inflection, cadence, modulation, accentuation His voice had a very slight German intonation.
2. incantation, spell, charm, formula, chant, invocation, hex (U.S. & Canad. informal), conjuration They could hear strange music and chanting intonations.

intonation

noun
A particular vocal quality that indicates some emotion or feeling:
Idiom: tone of voice.
Translations
تَغَيُّر في حِدَّة الصَّوْت
intonace
intonation
intonáció
ítónun; hljómfall
intonacija
intonācija
intonácia
intonacija
tonlama

intonation

[ˌɪntəʊˈneɪʃən] Nentonación f

intonation

[ˌɪntəˈneɪʃən] nintonation f

intonation

nIntonation f; (Ling also) → Satzmelodie f

intonation

[ˌɪntəʊˈneɪʃn] n (Linguistics) → intonazione f

intonation

(intəˈneiʃən) noun
the rise and fall of the voice in speech.
References in classic literature ?
Meg obediently following the long grass-blade which her new tutor used to point with, read slowly and timidly, unconsciously making poetry of the hard words by the soft intonation of her musical voice.
Not even all the disadvantage of nasal intonation could prevent the effect of the naturally fine voices, in airs at once wild and spirited.
Walters was very earnest of mien, and very sincere and honest at heart; and he held sacred things and places in such reverence, and so separated them from worldly matters, that unconsciously to himself his Sunday-school voice had acquired a peculiar intonation which was wholly absent on week-days.
Profound silence fell when he had uttered that word, with deep but low intonation.
Naseby,' he concluded, with an intonation that would have made his fortune on the stage, so just, so sad, so dignified, so like a man of the world and a philosopher, 'and you see a man who is content.
The old man motioned me in with his right hand with a courtly gesture, saying in excellent English, but with a strange intonation.
You read, I will suppose, attentively enough; but you cannot see the speaker's white, sincere face in the bright circle of the little lamp, nor hear the intonation of his voice.
For the iambic is, of all measures, the most colloquial: we see it in the fact that conversational speech runs into iambic lines more frequently than into any other kind of verse; rarely into hexameters, and only when we drop the colloquial intonation.
Yes, monsieur," replied the citizen, giving a still fainter intonation to his voice.
But, at the same time, the intonation was so soft that, however strange the speech might seem, it was impossible to be offended at it.
said Ben, with a long treble intonation, "what's folks's kin got to do wi't?
She had selected "Paradise Lost" from her shelf of classics, thinking, I suppose, the religious character of the book best adapted it to Sunday; I told her to begin at the beginning, and while she read Milton's invocation to that heavenly muse, who on the "secret top of Oreb or Sinai" had taught the Hebrew shepherd how in the womb of chaos, the conception of a world had originated and ripened, I enjoyed, undisturbed, the treble pleasure of having her near me, hearing the sound of her voice--a sound sweet and satisfying in my ear--and looking, by intervals, at her face: of this last privilege, I chiefly availed myself when I found fault with an intonation, a pause, or an emphasis; as long as I dogmatized, I might also gaze, without exciting too warm a flush.