intonation pattern


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intonation pattern

or

intonation contour

n
(Phonetics & Phonology) linguistics a characteristic series of musical pitch levels that serves to distinguish between questions, statements, and other types of utterance in a language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intonation pattern - intonations characteristic of questions and requests and statements
intonation, pitch contour, modulation - rise and fall of the voice pitch
Translations

intonation pattern

n (Ling) → Intonationsmuster nt
References in periodicals archive ?
The specific intonation pattern of Orkney English is probably its best known (and thus most stereotypical) feature.
This was assumed to represent the speakers' declarative intonation pattern, although it must be noted that there is a degree of variation in patterns across utterances and contexts, and that read speech is not necessarily representative of patterns found in spontaneous speech (e.
It should be noted that although the teacher is provided with the correct prosodic information, the reasons for certain words being stressed or the significance of a given intonation pattern are not always indicated.
The intonation pattern of declarative sentences in Persian can be formulized as in (5).
In L2 Estonian with moderate or strong accent, there appeared a straightforward transfer of at least one rising pitch accent from the intonation system of L1 into L2; the L1 intonation pattern with a high plateau (Russian pattern (a)) was often used instead of the Estonian pattern ending in a plateau (Estonian pattern (a)) in order to signal continuation from the part of the speaker.
Mulac, Anthony--Rose Nash 1977 "Effects of intonation pattern of synthesized and natural speech upon listener resolution of semantic ambiguity", Language and Speech 20/3: 274-279.
Question-word questions have their special intonation pattern as well.
The aim of this paper is to analyze if the intonation pattern of the question seeking information and introduced by a question word --either a pronoun or an adverb-- is determined by the sex of the speaker, in a formal register in Spanish spoken in Concepcion, Chile.
The second intonation pattern isolated by Weinreich was intuitively seized upon by Danny Kaye when he played Jacobofsky in the movie Me and the Colonel.
He would look me straight in the eye and `talk' for minutes at a time, imitating my intonation pattern.
The most common intonation pattern in English (and in other languages, according to Bolinger) involves two accented syllables in a sentence or similar utterance.
Using a childlike intonation pattern is demeaning and can be perceived as such by the patient.