intonation pattern


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intonation pattern

or

intonation contour

n
(Phonetics & Phonology) linguistics a characteristic series of musical pitch levels that serves to distinguish between questions, statements, and other types of utterance in a language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intonation pattern - intonations characteristic of questions and requests and statements
intonation, pitch contour, modulation - rise and fall of the voice pitch
Translations

intonation pattern

n (Ling) → Intonationsmuster nt
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be noted that although the teacher is provided with the correct prosodic information, the reasons for certain words being stressed or the significance of a given intonation pattern are not always indicated.
In L2 Estonian with moderate or strong accent, there appeared a straightforward transfer of at least one rising pitch accent from the intonation system of L1 into L2; the L1 intonation pattern with a high plateau (Russian pattern (a)) was often used instead of the Estonian pattern ending in a plateau (Estonian pattern (a)) in order to signal continuation from the part of the speaker.
Mulac, Anthony--Rose Nash 1977 "Effects of intonation pattern of synthesized and natural speech upon listener resolution of semantic ambiguity", Language and Speech 20/3: 274-279.
Question-word questions have their special intonation pattern as well.
The second intonation pattern isolated by Weinreich was intuitively seized upon by Danny Kaye when he played Jacobofsky in the movie Me and the Colonel.
He would look me straight in the eye and `talk' for minutes at a time, imitating my intonation pattern.
Using a childlike intonation pattern is demeaning and can be perceived as such by the patient.
For example, in figure 1 I've illustrated three consecutive intonation units, each of which follows a similar graphic intonation pattern.
As Pierrehumbert (1980: 17) notes, "English makes considerable use of pitch range, with the result that what is clearly the same basic intonation pattern can be produced in many different pitch ranges.
Let us now look more closely at this flat, low-pitched intonation pattern terminating with a drop.
I have suggested (134 and passim) that where linguistic stress pattern or intonation pattern conflicts with the patterns required by versification, the performer may have recourse to conflicting cues.
There is some indication that our phonetic competence also provides a mechanism for handling conflicting cues: we decode distorted words or intonation patterns in terms of the conflicting patterns that generated them--both for rhythmic and affective ends.